Grenfell survivors ordered to sign gagging orders before seeing report

Grenfell Tower survivors are ordered to sign gagging orders before being allowed to view long-awaited report into the tragedy

  • Survivors must sign ‘gagging’ agreement before they can view Grenfell report
  • The report is expected to criticise London Fire Brigade for a number of failings
  • The controversial ‘stay put’ policy is expected to feature heavily in the report 

Grenfell survivors have been ordered to sign non-disclosure agreements before they can view a long-awaited report into the tragedy.

Those who lost family and friends – and those who escaped the inferno which killed 72 – will meet Sir Martin Moore-Bick, chairman of the Grenfell Tower Inquiry, today. 

They will receive an embargoed copy of a report which will include never-before-seen details into the events that took place on the night of June 14, 2017.

The controversial ‘stay put’ policy is expected to feature heavily in the report. Residents who may have been able to escape were told to stay in their flats, before the policy was eventually abandoned at 2.47am

The report, which will be made public on Wednesday, is expected to criticise the London Fire Brigade for a number of failings, including telling residents to ‘stay put’ for hours as the blaze tore through the 24-storey west London tower block.

But the bereaved, survivors and residents will have to sign a gagging order before they can lay eyes on the report’s damning details. 

Moyra Samuels, from the Justice for Grenfell campaign group, told The Daily Telegraph: ‘You never know’ if families would be prosecuted for discussing or sharing the report before its official release.

‘They can’t discuss the contents of the report with the media. I can’t see how they’re going to prosecute them but you never know. I think they’re all meant to sign a non-disclosure agreement.

‘I think they’ll be expected to because the way that it is going to go is [Sir Martin] Moore-Bick is going to go through key headlines within the report and then as they leave they have to sign the non-disclosure and they’ll be given the physical copy.’

The revelation follows comments earlier this month from Doreen Lawrence, the mother of Stephen Lawrence, who told Channel 4 News that she is concerned the bereaved are not having their voices heard.

Those who lost family and friends – and those who escaped the inferno which killed 72 – will meet Sir Martin Moore-Bick, chairman of the Grenfell Tower Inquiry, today. They will receive an embargoed copy of a report. People are pictured paying tribute to victims two years on in June 2019

Those who lost family and friends – and those who escaped the inferno which killed 72 – will meet Sir Martin Moore-Bick, chairman of the Grenfell Tower Inquiry, today. They will receive an embargoed copy of a report. People are pictured paying tribute to victims two years on in June 2019

The controversial ‘stay put’ policy is expected to feature heavily in the report. 

Dr Barbara Lane, a leading fire engineer, has previously told the inquiry the strategy had substantially failed by 1.26am – 32 minutes after the first call to firefighters.

Residents who may have been able to escape were told to stay in their flats, before the policy was eventually abandoned at 2.47am.

A spokesman for the Grenfell Tower Inquiry said: ‘The Report is being provided under embargo to all core participants in line with Rule 17 of the Inquiry Rules 2006. All core participants…will need to sign an NDA, as the report will not be made public until Wednesday.’

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