Sir David Attenborough fans left ‘in tears’ after baby Albatross weathers 70mph storm

Viewers are left ‘crying their eyes out’ after baby Albatross nearly dies in 70mph storm before being reunited with its father in Sir David Attenborough’s new Seven Worlds, One Planet

  • Sir David Attenborough’s new documentary aired on BBC One earlier tonight and left viewers in tears
  • Seven Worlds, One Planet looked at how each continent has changed and looked at animals in the Antarctic
  • Viewers were left shocked after viewing the plight of a baby Albatross which was forced to battle winds

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Fans of Sir David Attenborough branded him a ‘national treasure’ tonight after his new documentary Seven Worlds, One Planet aired.

The programme looked at the seven continents of the world and how each has changed and evolved since the Pangaea broke up.

Narrating the BBC One documentary, Sir David claimed that this could be ‘the most critical moment for life on earth since the continents formed’.

Viewers were left in tears last night, with many saying they weren’t ’emotionally stable enough’ after clips showed a baby Albatross in Antarctica struggling to get back into its nest after a storm.

The documentary highlighted how various animals across the Antarctic struggle as the climate emergency continues to make it difficult for them

Sir David Attenborough's new documentary Seven World's, One Planet aired on BBC One tonight and many viewers were left upset at the plight of the animals

Sir David Attenborough’s new documentary Seven World’s, One Planet aired on BBC One tonight and many viewers were left upset at the plight of the animals

The baby Albatross (above) was left in its next while its parents went to get food, it managed to stay in the nest for a while before being blown out

The baby Albatross (above) was left in its next while its parents went to get food, it managed to stay in the nest for a while before being blown out

Before the baby Albatross was left on its own, its father touched beaks with it as a sign of affection. The first time it is left on its own is always the hardest

Before the baby Albatross was left on its own, its father touched beaks with it as a sign of affection. The first time it is left on its own is always the hardest

One Twitter user said they weren't 'mentally stable enough' for some of the images which aired on the BBC One show earlier tonight

One Twitter user said they weren’t ‘mentally stable enough’ for some of the images which aired on the BBC One show earlier tonight

One Twitter user said: ‘I’m not mentally stable enough for the baby albatross dying.’ This is while another added: ‘Thanks David Attenborough, mrs is crying over an albatross.’

Sir David explained that the 70mph winds that were hitting the baby Albatross were due to climate change, and that this had presented a problem that adult Albatross’ were unable to deal with. 

The programme also highlights the climate emergency and how this is having an impact of various species of animals across the world.

During the documentary, Sir David said a lot of the issues are due to a ‘change in the climate and added that the ‘warming of coldest region on earth effecting weather patterns’.

Others had been left in tears by the baby Albatross' plight. One user said his wife was crying after watching the emotional Albatross scenes

One Twitter user said those filming the documentary should 'help' the animals being shown after the bird was filmed struggling

One Twitter user said those filming the documentary should ‘help’ the animals being shown after the bird was filmed struggling

The Albatross was snug for a while until winds battered the area, forcing it out of its next and onto the floor below, where its father could not see it

The Albatross was snug for a while until winds battered the area, forcing it out of its next and onto the floor below, where its father could not see it 

The adult Albatross was seen flying away in order to retrieve food for its baby, before it left it they both touch beaks as a sign of affection

The adult Albatross was seen flying away in order to retrieve food for its baby, before it left it they both touch beaks as a sign of affection

He added that species such as the Albatross ‘can’t keep pace’ with the ‘changes effecting their world’.

The baby Albatross was left on its own for a while when its parents went to get food. It fell out of its nest when winds hit 70mph and was unable to get back in.

It fell underneath the nest, right beneath the feet of its father.

Grown Albatrosses are unable to recognise their babies by sight and only no its them if they are settled in the nest.

The baby gradually made its way back into the nest, where it was then welcomed by its father. 

Other users highlighted how Sir David was ‘dissapointed’ with the human race because of the climate emergency, after he stated that humans were one of the biggest predators for some of the Antarctic’s population. 

Social media users said that his documentaries had taught them ‘immeasurable amount about the planet’. 

Kelly said: ‘This mans knowledge has taught me immeasurable amounts about nature and planet earth. The term ‘National Treasure’ is banded around all too often these days, but Attenborough is more than worthy of that title’. 

The show focused on some of the most beautiful animals on the Antarctic. Many viewers also loved the segment about penguins

The show focused on some of the most beautiful animals on the Antarctic. Many viewers also loved the segment about penguins

Another hilarious moment of the show was when some baby penguins had been left on their own, after their parents had gone to find them food.

St Andrews bay in south Georgia is packed with half a million penguins and the director was able to capture just how much space they have, as well as some great interactions between the animals.

The deal between them being that the baby penguin would remain in the same spot so that the parent could return and feed it.

But some penguins wanted to explore and went over to some other animals that had been resting where they were exploring.

They got a nasty fright when it jumped up to scare them away, with many of them fleeing in the opposite direction. 

The programme also followed a group of penguins chicks (above) the image above shows them shaking and drying off

The programme also followed a group of penguins chicks (above) the image above shows them shaking and drying off

The documentary also explored underneath the frozen tops of the sea where many of the land animals frolick in the day.

Sir David said that by the end of winter the continent doubles in size making it the largest desert in the world.  

He said: ‘The frozen surface of the sea hides a great secret. It may be hostile above the ice but below it conditions are so stable that life has had time to diversify. Creatures grow to a great size.’

‘Only beginning to discover the details of these creatures.’

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