Boris Johnson is more trusted than Jeremy Corbyn, new poll of voters reveals

Boris Johnson is more trusted than Jeremy Corbyn to safely steward the NHS, new poll of voters reveals

  • More than four out of ten Labour voters likely to back the party if Mr Corbyn bowed out on December 12
  • Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson is seen as is seen as stronger, more statesmanlike and brainier than Mr Corbyn 
  • Asked which leader has the best health policies, 36 per cent said Mr Johnson and 34 per cent Mr Corbyn 

Advertisement

Boris Johnson is more trusted to care for the NHS than Jeremy Corbyn, according to a poll for the Daily Mail.

Asked which leader had the best health policies, 36 per cent of voters said Mr Johnson while 34 per cent opted for Mr Corbyn.

In another blow to the Labour leader, nearly one in six supporters of his party are terrified at the thought of him becoming prime minister. And four in ten would be more likely to stick with Labour in the December 12 General Election if Mr Corbyn stood down.

Even Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson was seen as stronger, more statesmanlike and smarter than Mr Corbyn in the Survation poll of 1,010 voters.

The Labour leader yesterday used his last Commons clash with the Prime Minister before the election to accuse him of putting the NHS ‘up for grabs’ to secure a trade deal with the United States.

Mr Johnson dismissed the claims and said a Labour government would be an ‘economic catastrophe’.

The graphic above shows how UK voters back Prime Minister Boris Johnson over Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn

Boris Johnson (pictured above) is more trusted to care for the NHS than Jeremy Corbyn, according to a poll for the Daily Mail today

Boris Johnson (pictured above) is more trusted to care for the NHS than Jeremy Corbyn, according to a poll for the Daily Mail today

Asked which leader had the best health policies, 36 per cent of voters said Mr Johnson while 34 per cent opted for Mr Corbyn (above)

Asked which leader had the best health policies, 36 per cent of voters said Mr Johnson while 34 per cent opted for Mr Corbyn (above)

Even Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson (pictured above) was seen as stronger, more statesmanlike and smarter than Mr Corbyn in the Survation poll of 1,010 voters

Even Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson (pictured above) was seen as stronger, more statesmanlike and smarter than Mr Corbyn in the Survation poll of 1,010 voters

The election battle gets under way properly today, with Mr Johnson visiting a hospital in East Anglia in his drive to convince the public the NHS is safe in his hands. He will use this first campaign visit to accuse Mr Corbyn of thwarting his ‘do or die’ pledge to take Britain out of the EU on time.

Mr Johnson, who said he would rather be ‘dead in a ditch’ than delay Brexit beyond tonight, will acknowledge the deadline has been missed – but lay the blame on Labour.

In other electoral developments yesterday:

  •  Nicky Morgan and Amber Rudd both announced they were quitting as MPs, leading a growing exodus from Parliament of Tory Remainers;
  • Mr Johnson is poised to make a substantial offer of free childcare in the Tory election manifesto;
  •  The Prime Minister was also poised to announce a moratorium on fracking;
  •  Mr Corbyn prepared to launch his campaign with a pledge to tackle the ‘corrupt system’ of tax dodgers and bad bosses;
  •  Labour was accused of risking the break-up of Britain by saying it wouldn’t block a second Scottish independence referendum;
  •  The Lib Dems were in talks with the Greens and Plaid Cymru over a Remain pact;
  •  Nigel Farage suggested his Brexit Party will target Labour Leave seats;
  •  Dominic Grieve and Antoinette Sandbach said they would stand as independents in their current seats – against Tory candidates;
  •  Mr Corbyn challenged Mr Johnson to a TV debate during the campaign.

Today’s poll suggests that Mr Johnson’s decision to make the NHS a top priority since entering No 10 is paying off. As well as being ahead on the NHS, the Prime Minister is 18 points ahead on jobs, a key issue for working-class voters.

Mr Johnson is streets ahead on the economy, defence, trade and foreign relations. The only issue where Mr Corbyn is in the lead is welfare.

The Tories have 34 per cent support overall, eight points ahead of Labour on 26, with the Lib Dems on 19 and the Brexit Party on 12.

That would be enough to give the Prime Minister a slim Commons majority.

According to those surveyed, Mr Johnson’s poll advantage could increase over the six-week contest. A total of 44 per cent say he is the best campaigner, with Mr Corbyn on 21 and Miss Swinson on ten. Asked who would be the best PM, Mr Johnson scores 42 and Mr Corbyn 19, only four ahead of Swinson on 15.

Nicky Morgan

Amber Rudd

Nicky Morgan (left) and Amber Rudd (right) both announced that they were quitting as MPs Parliament, leading a growing exodus from Parliament of Tory Remainers

And in an encouraging sign for Mr Johnson’s attempt to squeeze the Brexit vote, support for Mr Farage’s party continues to fall. It is now barely half the level it was before Mr Johnson entered No 10. In the same period, Tory support has steadily risen, suggesting Conservatives who switched to the Brexit Party when Theresa May was leader are returning to the fold.

The figures provide further evidence that Mr Corbyn’s fence-sitting on Brexit could see Labour support haemorrhage to the fervently anti-Brexit Lib Dems.

Boris Johnson is putting the NHS ‘up for grabs’, claims Jeremy Corbyn 

Jeremy Corbyn has claimed Boris Johnson would leave the NHS is ‘up for grabs’ in a future trade deal with the US. 

He told The Mirror: ‘Boris Johnson’s planned sell-out deal with Donald Trump means yet more NHS money taken away from patients and handed to shareholders.

‘The NHS is up for grabs by US corporations in a Trump trade plot.

‘It has been revealed that the cost of drugs and medicines has repeatedly been discussed between US and UK trade officials.

‘Labour won’t let Donald Trump get his hands on our National Health Service.’

 

Mr Johnson’s Brexit stance is favoured by 41 per cent; Remainer Miss Swinson is on 23 with Mr Corbyn on a meagre 15.

A total of 42 per cent of Labour supporters say they would be more likely to vote for the party if Mr Corbyn stepped down; 18 per cent say they would be less likely to vote Labour.

Nor were voters convinced by Mr Corbyn’s excuses for initially holding out against a December election.

Nearly half say he did so because he was scared of losing; 30 per cent say it was to avoid No Deal; just 9 per cent believed him when he said it would be too cold to vote.

More than half of voters (51 per cent) say Mr Johnson is right to have called a poll.

Astonishingly, 15 per cent of Labour voters will feel ‘fear’ if Mr Corbyn triumphs on December 12; 58 per cent will be ‘joyful.’ Similarly, one in ten Labour voters will feel ‘joy’ if Mr Johnson is victorious; 73 per cent will be ‘fearful’.

The Conservative lead extends across the parties’ front benches. Chancellor Sajid Javid, Home Secretary Priti Patel and Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab are all more popular than Labour counterparts John McDonnell, Diane Abbott and Emily Thornberry.

A total of 44 per cent blame Parliament for forcing the Prime Minister to break his ‘die in a ditch’ pledge to leave the EU by today; 32 per cent point the finger at Mr Johnson himself; 11 per cent blame Brussels.

Survation interviewed 1,010 adults online on Tuesday and yesterday after all four main parties backed a December election.  

Nigel Farage (pictured above) suggested that the Brexit Party will target Labour Leave seats - which could still cost the Tories an election win

Nigel Farage (pictured above) suggested that the Brexit Party will target Labour Leave seats – which could still cost the Tories an election win

Dominic Grieve

Antoinette Sandbach

Dominic Grieve (left) and Antoinette Sandbach (right) said they would stand as independents in their current seats – against Tory candidates

Distinct Today is a news media company, focused on the intersection between hyper-relevant content and digital innovation. Distinct Today curates editorial news content, experiences, and events across multiple platforms including email, mobile, online and offline. Distinct Today is headquartered in Houston, Texas. The company is privately held. Distinct Today targets an affluent, college-educated audience.