The Jeremy Kyle Show is AXED PERMANENTLY after death of Steven Dymond

ITV axes The Jeremy Kyle Show PERMANENTLY and says it made decision ‘given the gravity of recent events’ after ‘humiliated’ grandfather who failed lie detector test on show ‘killed himself’

  • Steven Dymond, 63, was found dead on May 9 following appearance on May 2
  • Took lie-detector test to convince fiancée he hadn’t been unfaithful but failed
  • ITV chief executive Carolyn McCall admits it is ‘the right time for show to end’ 
  • MPs on Commons committee will discuss case after calling for ITV to pull show
  • It’s been replaced so far by Dickinson’s Real Deal and will be for the rest of May

Digger driver Steven Dymond died a week after appearing on The Jeremy Kyle Show

ITV today permanently axed The Jeremy Kyle Show after a grandfather was found dead just a week after being filmed for the controversial programme.

Network chief Carolyn McCall admitted it was ‘the right time for the show to end’ given the ‘gravity of recent events’ after an outcry followed the death of Steven Dymond, 63, with MPs having urged the broadcaster to pull the programme.

Mr Dymond took a lie-detector test on May 2 to convince fiancée Jane Callaghan he had been faithful, but was told he had failed. His body was found in his Portsmouth flat a week later on May 9 where he had been dead for days.

More than 3,000 episodes of The Jeremy Kyle Show have been shown on ITV since July 2005, when it first replaced Trisha.

The show has attracted legions of loyal fans over 14 years for its argumentative discussions about sex and addiction in front of a studio audience – but it has been slammed as ‘bear baiting’ and spawned a string of complaints from guests. 

These included Dwayne Davison, 27, of Nottingham, who tried to kill himself after being publicly shamed; Harry Henson, 30, of North London, who was disowned by his family after being allegedly falsely accused of theft; and Gulf War veteran Fergus Kenny, 49, of Leicestershire, who had PTSD and was ‘made to feel like a scumbag’. 

Prime Minister Theresa May’s spokesman called the death ‘deeply concerning’, while MPs on an influential Commons committee will discuss the case today. 

ITV’s This Morning host Holly Willoughby described the death and show’s end as a ‘terrible shock’ for The Jeremy Kyle Show team, while Kyle’s Good Morning Britain colleague Piers Morgan defended him as a ‘great guy and an excellent broadcaster’. 

While today’s decision was immediately met by a backlash from some viewers furious that it had been pulled after 16 series because of the death, many had called for the top-rated ITV show to be axed over concerns it preyed on the vulnerable. 

Jeremy Kyle on the show

Jeremy Kyle arrives back at his £3million home in Windsor yesterday evening

ITV today revealed The Jeremy Kyle Show would be axed permanently after it was taken off air

One posted the hashtag #SaveJeremyKyle, but another said ‘goodbye and good riddance’ and a third said it was an ‘utterly toxic’ programme. Others questioned why Jeremy Kyle was axed and Love Island was still on air after two contestants died.

Ms McCall, a former boss of easyJet and The Guardian, said today: ‘Given the gravity of recent events we have decided to end production of The Jeremy Kyle Show.

‘The Jeremy Kyle Show has had a loyal audience and has been made by a dedicated production team for 14 years, but now is the right time for the show to end. Everyone at ITV’s thoughts and sympathies are with the family and friends of Steve Dymond.’

Full statement from ITV chief executive

Carolyn McCall, ITV’s chief executive, announced today: ‘Given the gravity of recent events we have decided to end production of The Jeremy Kyle Show.

‘The Jeremy Kyle Show has had a loyal audience and has been made by a dedicated production team for 14 years, but now is the right time for the show to end. 

‘Everyone at ITV’s thoughts and sympathies are with the family and friends of Steve Dymond.’ 

Kyle, who was filmed near his £3million family home in Windsor yesterday, has so far declined to comment personally – and it is not known what will replace his show.

The programme has so far been replaced with antiques show Dickinson’s Real Deal – and this will continue for the rest of the month, with ITV set to confirm further future scheduling at a later date. 

The show was initially pulled off air at the last minute on Monday – and a review of the episode featuring Mr Dymond is underway, with Ofcom also involved. 

One of ITV’s most popular daytime programmes in Britain, a US version of the show ended in 2013 after just two seasons. Attention will now turn to whether the show – produced by ITV Studios at MediaCity in Salford – will ever appear again on another UK network.

The programme has faced sustained criticism for years, including from a judge in Manchester in September 2007 who condemned it as a ‘human form of bear baiting’. ITV said that it will continue to work with Kyle on other projects, but has not yet specified what those will be. 

MP Charles Walker said yesterday that it would be ‘extremely sensible’ if ITV said ‘this has gone far enough’, adding that it was ‘a watershed moment’. 

Mr Dymond was discovered dead in the room he had been renting since separating from Jane Callaghan, who appeared on the television show beside him (pictured together)

Mr Dymond was discovered dead in the room he had been renting since separating from Jane Callaghan, who appeared on the television show beside him (pictured together) 

Audience member tells of moment guest ‘collapsed to ground’ and begged his fiancée for forgiveness

An audience member who was at the recording of The Jeremy Kyle Show featuring a guest who died in a suspected suicide days later has spoken of the heartbreaking moment he collapsed to the ground after failing a lie detector test.

Manchester-based student Babette Lucas-Marriott said Steve Dymond, 63, was left sobbing and begging his fiancee for forgiveness after the audience were told he was ‘lying’ over allegations of infidelity.

Mr Dymond was found dead days later at his home in Portsmouth, Hampshire, and the programme has been taken off air while an investigation is carried out.

Miss Lucas-Marriott, 20, said Mr Dymond had been ‘crying from the start’ of the episode but by the end had realised he had ‘lost his entire life’ with his partner Jane Callaghan.

She told the BBC: ‘He was so convinced he would pass this test and that everything would be fine.’

The Manchester Metropolitan University student added: ‘He [Kyle] asked the audience ‘Who thinks he is going to pass [the test]’ and 99 per cent of the audience put their hands up, including myself.

‘And then he said he’d failed and you just saw him [Mr Dymond] collapse to the ground.

‘He just could not believe what he had heard. He was begging his fiancee for forgiveness.

‘They were both sobbing; they were just completely and utterly devastated and it was clear that he had just lost his entire life with his fiancee.’

Miss Lucas-Marriott said the mood in the audience immediately changes and that ‘everybody was uncomfortable’ and ‘no one wanted to be there’.

Mr Dymond’s son Carl Woolley, 39, said his father had been ‘distraught’ over the breakdown of his relationship and hoped the show would help him ‘clear his name’.

Timeline of The Jeremy Kyle Show’s downfall 

May 2: Steven Dymond fails a lie detector test when appearing on The Jeremy Kyle Show

May 9: Mr Dymond’s body is found at his flat in Portsmouth, and paramedics later say he has been dead for days

May 13: ITV pulls The Jeremy Kyle Show from its schedule and says it has been suspended indefinitely

May 14: Pressure mounts on ITV from MPs to cancel the show

May 15: ITV’s chief executive says the show has been axed for good

Mr Woolley was said to have been contacted by a concerned relative after Mr Dymond was left in a highly emotional state following the recording.

‘I called after he got home from filming the episode,’ Mr Wooley told the Daily Mail. ‘He was distraught over the break-up of the relationship. 

‘He had gone on the show solely to clear his name (about allegedly cheating on Ms Callaghan) but he said it had gone wrong because of the lie detector test.’

Referring to his father by his first name, Mr Woolley said: ‘Steve told me ‘Kyle really laid into me’. Presumably that was at the point when they announced the lie detector result.’

Prior to the phone call, the father and son are said to have not spoken for seven years and had not seen each other in person for 36 years. 

Mr Dymond’s body was found at an address in Portsmouth on May 9.

Carl Woolley said his father was devastated after the show destroyed his relationship

Carl Woolley said his father was devastated after the show destroyed his relationship

Hampshire Police said the death is not being treated as suspicious and a file was being prepared for the coroner.

It emerged yesterday that Mr Dymond had been the subject of a warrant after he failed to attend a court hearing for non-payment of a fine.

He was originally ordered to pay nearly £6,000 in compensation to two finance companies in 1997 at Poole Magistrates’ Court.

And in February, Mr Dymond had been due to attend a hearing at Southampton Magistrates’ Court for the non-payment of a fine of £4,329.

After he failed to attend the hearing, a warrant was issued for his arrest.

Yesterday, Downing Street and Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright said TV firms must support participants in their shows.

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: ‘This is a deeply concerning case.

‘Broadcasters and production companies have a responsibility for the mental health and wellbeing of participants and viewers of their programmes.

Mr Dymond's body was found in a flat on this road in Portsmouth on May 9, pictured yesterday

Mr Dymond’s body was found in a flat on this road in Portsmouth on May 9, pictured yesterday

‘We are clear they must have appropriate levels of support in place.’

MP Charles Walker had said it would be 'extremely sensible' if ITV said 'this has gone far enough', and it was 'a watershed moment'

MP Charles Walker had said it would be ‘extremely sensible’ if ITV said ‘this has gone far enough’, and it was ‘a watershed moment’

Damian Collins, chairman of the Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee (DCMS), said it will discuss ‘what should be done to review the duty of care support for people appearing in reality TV shows’ in its private meeting today.

Jeremy Kyle guest Lucy Loyhian, who appeared on the show in 2016, said she felt let down by producers after being told they would help her through her severe depression and anxiety.

Ms Loyhian, 34, from Darlington, County Durham, said Kyle and the producers were only interested in talking about sex, and she felt bullied and misquoted.

She told MailOnline: ‘After being absolutely torn about by all the lies that had be written down and things they all made up and not being able to get a word in edgeways, I was promised aftercare to help me through all of this.

‘On over ten occasions including on the show itself I was promised this. This didn’t happen and we were sent packing after the show with nothing, just sent home in a taxi.

Danniella Westbrook defends Jeremy Kyle who ‘saved her life’

Danniella Westbrook said she would not be alive without the help of Jeremy Kyle as she spoke about her appearances on his programme, which has been cancelled permanently by ITV.

Following the death of Steve Dymond, 63, who had appeared on the The Jeremy Kyle Show, ITV announced its decision to end the controversial programme for good.

Danniella Westbrook on Jeremy Kyle's show

Danniella Westbrook on Jeremy Kyle’s show

In a statement, the broadcaster’s chief executive Carolyn McCall said ‘given the gravity of recent events’ it has decided to end the show, which had a 14-year run.

Ex-EastEnders star Westbrook was due to appear in a celebrity edition of the show alongside former X Factor contestant Christopher Maloney.

She had also previously appeared on the programme to seek help and talk about her high-profile battle with substance abuse and was sent to rehab courtesy of the show.

Appearing on Channel 5’s Jeremy Vine Show, she said: ‘If it wasn’t for Jeremy Kyle I probably wouldn’t be alive myself.’

She told Vine her son had pleaded with her not to appear on the show but said she had done it for the fee.

The actress praised Kyle and his team, including psychotherapist Graham Stanier, for their support and level of care.

She said: ‘They really have looked after me and you know, since I’ve been in rehab I’ve spoken to Jeremy all the time and Graham and the team and went I went back on the show, reassessed and (I was) really looked after.

‘This is my friend of 20 years and he was hard on me but someone needed to be and he was hard on me because he is my friend.’

Former X Factor contestant Lucy Spraggan, who appeared on ITV’s reality singing series in 2012, urged the broadcaster to alter the way they ‘see their responsibility to the people on your shows’.

In one of a number of strongly-worded tweets, she said: ‘ITV, change the way you see your responsibility to the people on your shows.

‘Start/improve aftercare, accept responsibility, give them HELP. As one show is axed another will begin and the perpetual process will start again. I’ve been there, it’s f****** lonely.’ 

‘So after all the humiliation I got no help and I just wanted to end my life on many occasions. Getting stopped in the street about how Jeremy made me look and ‘was it true’, all this made up stuff, they said.’

Ms Loyhian added that she was also urged to take a lie-detector test when she insisted she did not want one, but appearing on the show ‘destroyed me as a vulnerable person and nearly broke my family up’.

She added: ‘I would never ever do that again, nor would I ever trust any show that does such a thing. My advice would be to close the show down and never to let it grace our screens again, it’s dangerous.’

A spokesman for the Ofcom broadcasting watchdog said Mr Dymond’s death was ‘very distressing’.

They added: ‘Although we can only assess content that has been broadcast, we are discussing this programme with ITV as a priority to understand what took place.’

Ms Callaghan told The Sun that Mr Dymond had been ‘quietly struggling’, but praised the show’s team for their after-care efforts.

ITV had launched a review into the episode they featured in.

However some social media users questioned why The Jeremy Kyle Show will be axed and Love Island was still on air following the deaths of two contestants

Sophie Gradon, 32, who appeared on series two in 2016, was found dead last June, while Mike Thalassitis, 26, who took part a year later, died in March.

Chris Dennis tweeted: ‘Can someone at ITV please explain why there’s talk of pulling the Jeremy Kyle Show for good when someone has died, but you’re still adamant about Love Island starting in a few weeks? 

‘I seem to remember guests from that show have died recently too…? Thanks.’

Ollie Dockery added: ‘So Jeremy Kyle gets cancelled due to the possible effect it had resulting in a participants’ death, yet Love Island has had two participants take their own life in a far shorter period of time? 

‘If you’re gonna pretend you care about mental health, ITV, at least be consistent.’ 

An ITV spokesman said: ‘Prior to the show a comprehensive assessment is carried out by the guest welfare team on all potential contributors. The guests are interviewed by guest welfare face-to-face at studios and prior to filming. 

‘Throughout filming, the participants are supported by the guest welfare team. After filming has ended, all guests are seen by a member of the guest welfare team.’

Ms McCall addressed the issue of taking the show off air in an email to ITV staff earlier this week.

Sophie Gradon

Mike Thalassitis

ITV’s Love Island star Sophie Gradon (left), 32, who appeared on series two in 2016 was found dead last June, while Mike Thalassitis (right), 26, who took part a year later, died in March

‘This was a very difficult decision to make but we felt that it would be inappropriate to continue to broadcast the show when a participant on it has so recently died,’ she wrote.

Jeremy Kyle Show is a ‘theatre of cruelty’ 

The Jeremy Kyle Show has been branded a ‘theatre of cruelty’ following the apparent suicide of a man who appeared on the programme.

Experts have also urged ITV to drop the programme following the death and compared it to Romans setting lions on Christmas martyrs.

ITV pulled the confrontational talk show indefinitely following the death of a guest, named as Steve Dymond, a week after the programme was filmed.

Professor Sir Simon Wessely, former president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said the show should be dropped and Jeremy Kyle’s ‘help’ stretches the meaning of the word to the limit.

He said powerful emotions of shame and guilt can lead to a breakdown and these psychological forces are amplified by the show’s large audience.

There have been calls for a review into the impact of reality TV on the mental health of vulnerable people and concerns have been raised over the damage caused by public ‘shaming’.

Professor Sir Simon said: ‘I think it should be dropped, actually. It’s the theatre of cruelty. And yes, it might entertain a million people a day, but then again so did Christians versus lions.

‘Of course, the show will not be the only factor implicated. But like all social media, this show is an amplifying force, multiplier.

‘Shame/guilt is a very powerful emotion and we know that it can precipitate a ‘breakdown’ to use the vernacular, just as with a family context or in a tight social group such as an army unit. So it’s not difficult to imagine that this is multiplied when the audience is a million.’ 

‘This decision is not in any way a reflection on the show, but the best way we think we can protect the show and the production team from this reaction we expect to this death.’

It comes after former ITV chief Michael Grade had said the broadcaster would ‘probably lose a very popular show’ over the crisis engulfing Jeremy Kyle.

Lord Grade said it would be difficult for ITV to bring back the show after the death of Mr Dymond unless it was ‘completely exonerated’.

But the former executive chairman pointed out guests go onto the confrontational chat show ‘knowing exactly what they’re in for’ because of its popularity.

Lord Grade, 76, told BBC News: ‘I think they’re managing it extremely well, they’ve got an enquiry, Ofcom are coming in to look at the tragedy and see who’s to blame or what lessons can be learned.

‘They’re going to lose a very popular show, probably. It will be very difficult to bring it back now unless there are some reasons we don’t know that they’re completely exonerated.

‘I don’t think it hurts ITV. They’ve got a hole in the schedule. They’ve got some very creative people there, they’ll come up with some new format, some new idea – it’s an opportunity as much as anything.

‘But I think they’re right, absolutely right to take the programme off the air. I think they’ve behaved impeccably. These crises are all about how you handle them in the end.’

He added that it was ‘very important to remember that nobody goes onto the Kyle Show not knowing what they’re in for’.

Lord Grade continued: ‘It’s a very well-known show and when you agree to participate, you know you’re going into a sort-of tabloid confrontational situation.

‘It’s not like they are caught unaware. So people do go in knowing exactly what they’re in for.’ 

How Jeremy Kyle’s hit talk show made him a daytime TV stalwart 

Jeremy Kyle made a name for himself as the host of his eponymous talk show, presiding over rowing members of the public airing their issues on TV.

The confrontational programme, which has been pulled off the air for good following the death of a guest, had been a popular addition to ITV’s daytime schedule since it started in 2005, making the 53-year-old presenter a household name.

The Jeremy Kyle Show centred around its host confronting guests over infidelities, addictions, dysfunctional relationships and parenting methods, among a myriad of other personal disputes.

Prior to his broadcasting career, Kyle worked in Marks & Spencer and had jobs as an insurance salesman and a recruitment consultant before taking on a number of radio presenting jobs in the 1990s.

After stints at several local stations, including Kent’s Invicta FM, he joined BRMB in Birmingham, where he fronted the shows Late And Live and Jezza’s Jukebox.

By 2000, Kyle had carved out a respectable radio career and moved to Virgin Radio and then London’s Capital FM, where he hosted his Confessions show, having taken the format with him from Virgin.

The programme was a precursor to what would later inspire his ITV talk show, allowing listeners to call in with their relationship issues and dilemmas while he listened and offered advice.

In July 2005, Kyle was drafted in to host his own talk show on ITV following the departure of Trisha Goddard, who had her own morning programme on the channel.

Reminiscent of The Jerry Springer Show in the US, it was an early hit for tackling issues around traditional family values, and was nominated for a National Television Award in 2007 in the most popular factual programme category.

However, it also divided opinion among viewers for its fiery confrontations and rowdy format, with family members airing their dirty laundry on stage in front of an audience while Kyle would watch on.

Kyle would act as mediator to his guests, being either gentle and kind or shouting at them to pull their lives together.

He drew criticism for his hard-nosed style, but also won himself legions of fans for his tactics.

In 2007, Manchester judge Alan Berg described the programme as ‘human bear-baiting’ and that it existed to ‘titillate bored members of the public with nothing better to do’.

In 2011, Kyle took his programme over to the US to launch his programme Stateside, but it was cancelled the following year due to poor ratings.

Away from The Jeremy Kyle Show, he has acted as a guest presenter on ITV’s Good Morning Britain since 2016, and he has fronted a number of other programmes, including Military Driving School, Jeremy Kyle’s Emergency Room and the game show High Stakes.

In 2009, he released his first book, I’m Only Being Honest, focusing on the UK’s social issues and his opinions on how to solve them.

Kyle’s personal life has seen him make headlines over the years.

He married his first wife Kirsty Rowley in 1989 but they split soon after due to Kyle’s gambling addiction.

He met Carla Germaine when she entered a competition to marry a stranger on Birmingham radio station BRMB, where Kyle was working at the time.

She married the stranger but they later split up and she got together with Kyle, marrying him in 2002.

In 2015 they split after 13 years of marriage, and were granted a decree nisi the following year, with a lawyer for Germaine petitioning for divorce on the grounds of unreasonable behaviour.

Last year, Kyle became engaged to Vicky Burton, the former nanny of his children.

Kyle has four children – a daughter with Rowley, and two daughters and a son with Germaine.

The broadcaster revealed he had obsessive compulsive disorder in 2009, admitting that he would often lick his phone to make sure it was clean, among other things, and in 2012 he was diagnosed with testicular cancer.

Following the cancellation of The Jeremy Kyle Show, ITV has said it will continue to work with Kyle on other projects.

Jeremy Kyle Show’s ‘most hated guest ever’ reveals he’s struggled for work, is mocked in the street and even tried to kill himself after public shaming over ‘worst thing that’s happened in my life’

A man said to be the most hated guest ever on The Jeremy Kyle Show has told how he tried to kill himself after being publicly shamed on the ITV programme.

Dwayne Davison, 27, of Nottingham, revealed he has struggled for work and been mocked in the street following the ‘worst thing that has ever happened in my life’.

The guest said his treatment at the hands of the chat show’s producers and the subsequent YouTube clips of his appearance have caused him grief for five years.

Mr Davison spoke out following the death of show participant Steve Dymond, 63, who apparently took his own life one week after appearing on the programme.

Meanwhile self-confessed ‘sex addict’ father-of-eight Danny Fuller, who has appeared on the show five times, has claimed bosses deliberately ‘wind up guests’ and ‘fail to provide aftercare’. 

Dwayne Davison was in his early 20s and living in Nottingham when he became involved with the programme in 2014. He is pictured on the show (left) with his partner Barbara Wane (right)

Dwayne Davison was in his early 20s and living in Nottingham when he became involved with the programme in 2014. He is pictured on the show (left) with his partner Barbara Wane (right)

Mr Dymond took a lie detector test on May 2 to convince fiancée Jane Callaghan he had not been unfaithful, but failed and was found dead in Portsmouth on May 9.

Yesterday, Mr Davison told the Guardian: ‘I’ve had loads and loads of abuse and in 2018 I decided I’d had enough. My girlfriend had some toothache medication.

‘I took a load of it, and I can’t remember the rest. A few hours later my girlfriend came upstairs and she called the ambulance.’

He briefly stopped breathing but medics were able to revive him before it was too late. Mr Davison said: ‘At the hospital they said I would have died. 

‘I know this is putting responsibility on other places but I 100 per cent put it on that show. That show has ruined my life. It’s evil.’

Mr Davison, 27, of Nottingham, appeared on The Jeremy Kyle Show five years ago

Mr Davison, 27, of Nottingham, appeared on The Jeremy Kyle Show five years ago

Mr Davison, 24, pictured with partner Barbara Wane, 41, said being on the show ruined his life

Mr Davison, 24, pictured with partner Barbara Wane, 41, said being on the show ruined his life

Mr Davison was in his early 20s and living in Nottingham when he became involved with the programme in 2014.

He was in a relationship with an older woman and became certain she was cheating on him. 

He sent a text message to the programme in the hope of a free lie detector test to set the record straight.

‘It’s the worst thing that has ever happened in my life,’ he said. ‘They put the spoon in and stirred around my whole life.’

Mr Davison said the video subsequently being uploaded to YouTube – which led to employers letting him go.

Mr Davison, 24, with his partner Ms Wane, 41

Mr Davison, 24, with his partner Ms Wane, 41

The video was viewed by millions and shared with captions describing him as the rudest and most hated guest in the show’s history.

He also claimed the show would intentionally provoke participants into causing offence.

Footage would be edited to cast them in an unflattering light and all subsequent aftercare by producers was undone by the final footage.

He also remarked on the speed he and his then-girlfriend were signed up after texting the programme.

A producer rang back and invited them to travel up to the show’s filming base in Salford.

‘Within an hour there was a taxi at the door,’ he said. ‘You don’t have time to think about it or phone your family. 

‘Once you’re at the hotel, you feel you have to do the show. My mum begged me not to go on.’

He also claimed not to have been questioned over mental health issues and signed a contract without having time to read it.

He claims to have been provoked by Kyle and producers, being warned ‘Jeremy hates people who don’t talk.’

‘When are they going to take it seriously?’ he said. ‘Is it going to take more people to die for them to think maybe we are ruining people’s lives?’ 

Mr Dymond's body was found on May 9 in a flat on this road in Portsmouth, pictured yesterday

Mr Dymond’s body was found on May 9 in a flat on this road in Portsmouth, pictured yesterday

Meanwhile Mr Fuller, 36, from Bathgate, West Lothian, has appeared on the show with former partners and also with current girlfriend Shauner Procter, 18.

He accused bosses of encouraging ‘screaming and shouting’, while Miss Procter said workers on the show ensured guests were ‘hyped up’ so ‘adrenaline is rushing’ when they appeared.

Mr Fuller went on the show in 2011 with an ex, and revealed he had slept with 80 women and had been engaged to two lovers at the same time.

He went on again with the results of a paternity test and to accuse another former partner of trying to throw his pet dog, called Shirley Basset, under a bus.

The self-employed driver said the first time he went on the show there was aftercare, but questioned whether guests were appropriately supported.

Mr Fuller said: ‘All you get is a thank you and a postcard through the door.

Father-of-eight Danny Fuller, 36, pictured with partner Shauner Procter, 18, and one of his children, claims the show has little aftercare and gives guests 'a thank you and a postcard'

Father-of-eight Danny Fuller, 36, pictured with partner Shauner Procter, 18, and one of his children, claims the show has little aftercare and gives guests ‘a thank you and a postcard’

Mr Fuller, pictured with Ms Procter, said he went on the show five times and claimed bosses 'deliberately wind up guests'

Mr Fuller, pictured with Ms Procter, said he went on the show five times and claimed bosses ‘deliberately wind up guests’

‘They tell you to go out and not to hold back. They want you to play off each other and encourage it – the screaming and shouting.

‘They take you down the night before, put you in a nice hotel and give you a meal allowance.

‘They pick you up at 9am and then they separate you as much as they can. They put you in separate rooms for three or four hours.

‘There are runners or producers going backwards and forwards telling you they can’t believe what your partner said about you.’ 

Mr Fuller added: ‘There’s no calming down period. The first time I went on there was aftercare, fair play, but after that nothing.

‘The second time I went on I drove down and they took my car keys off me until I’d done my bit so I couldn’t go home.’

Miss Procter said: ‘I wouldn’t go on again. I was angry afterwards. They say you get aftercare but you don’t.

‘It’s really stressful. They ring you ten times asking the same questions. They hype you up so the adrenaline is rushing when you go on.’

The Jeremy Kyle Show has been on air since 2005 with more than 3,000 episodes broadcast

The Jeremy Kyle Show has been on air since 2005 with more than 3,000 episodes broadcast

As for Mr Dymond, his son Carl Woolley, 39, said yesterday that his father had been ‘distraught’ over the breakdown of his relationship and hoped the show would help him ‘clear his name’.

News of Mr Dymond’s death prompted an outcry and ITV has been urged to end the confrontational programme for good.

The Prime Minister’s spokesman described the incident as ‘deeply concerning’, while MPs on an influential Commons committee are due to discuss the case today.

The broadcaster’s chief executive, Dame Carolyn McCall, addressed the issue in an email to ITV staff.

‘This was a very difficult decision to make but we felt that it would be inappropriate to continue to broadcast the show when a participant on it has so recently died,’ she wrote.

Mr Dymond apparently took his own life one week after appearing on the programme

Mr Dymond apparently took his own life one week after appearing on the programme

‘This decision is not in any way a reflection on the show, but the best way we think we can protect the show and the production team from this reaction we expect to this death.’

However some social media users questioned why The Jeremy Kyle Show faces being axed and Love Island is still on air following the deaths of two contestants

Sophie Gradon, 32, who appeared on series two in 2016, was found dead last June, while Mike Thalassitis, 26, who took part a year later, died in March.

Chris Dennis tweeted: ‘Can someone at ITV please explain why there’s talk of pulling the Jeremy Kyle Show for good when someone has died, but you’re still adamant about Love Island starting in a few weeks? I seem to remember guests from that show have died recently too…? Thanks.’

Ollie Dockery added: ‘So Jeremy Kyle gets cancelled due to the possible effect it had resulting in a participants’ death, yet Love Island has had two participants take their own life in a far shorter period of time? If you’re gonna pretend you care about mental health, ITV, at least be consistent.’ 

An ITV spokesman said: ‘Prior to the show a comprehensive assessment is carried out by the guest welfare team on all potential contributors.

‘The guests are interviewed by guest welfare face-to-face at studios and prior to filming. Throughout filming, the participants are supported by the guest welfare team.

‘After filming has ended, all guests are seen by a member of the guest welfare team.’

For confidential support call the Samaritans on 116123, or visit a local Samaritans branch. See samaritans.org 

‘Jeremy Kyle Show left me inches from suicide’: Guest claims he was disowned by his family and almost made homeless after being falsely accused of theft on ITV programme

By JOSEPH CURTIS FOR MAILONLINE 

Another Jeremy Kyle Show guest has slammed the programme claiming he considered killing himself after being disowned by his family and made homeless when he was ‘falsely accused of theft’.

Harry Henson, 30, appeared on the ITV show in 2015 and wanted to take a lie detector test to prove his innocence after being accused of stealing a set of golf clubs from his mother’s partner.

But Mr Henson, of Barnet, is adamant the test was wrong after it indicated he was the thief and said the stress made him ‘relapse into cocaine and cannabis’.

Producers of the show have said over the years that the test is not 100% accurate but Mr Henson claims the result made him ‘suicidal’ and sleeping on benches.

It comes after the suspected suicide of Steven Dymond, 63, who recorded a lie detector segment last week but was found dead at his home in Portsmouth days later.

Harry Henson, pictured, has slammed The Jeremy Kyle Show after claiming an appearance in 2015 left him feeling suicidal

Harry Henson, pictured, has slammed The Jeremy Kyle Show after claiming an appearance in 2015 left him feeling suicidal

Speaking about his experience, father-of-three Mr Henson told the Mirror: ‘It was distressing, I was crying most of the time. I even walked up to the train station and was standing there going, ‘I can’t f***ing do this anymore, it’s a joke’.

‘I had a really bad experience. I’m glad they can actually see it now for what it is. It’s meant to be a talk show, it’s not meant to bring vulnerable people there and take the p*** out of them and then tell them to bugger off home after ruining your life.

Mr Henson has also added to criticism of the aftercare service provided by the show, with Mr Dymond’s landlady claiming the producers didn’t try to contact him until it was too late.

He said: ‘Pretty much the care after that was rubbish – it felt like I got abused in a way, like I was taken the p*** out of.’

Mr Henson, pictured centre on the show, took a lie detector test which suggested he stole golf clubs from his mother's partner, which he denied. He said the result was false and led to his family disowning him

Mr Henson, pictured centre on the show, took a lie detector test which suggested he stole golf clubs from his mother’s partner, which he denied. He said the result was false and led to his family disowning him

Mr Henson added he was then ‘shoved in a taxi’ and left to deal with four panic attacks outside ITV Studios on his own, and later was offered ’10 minutes with a psychologist’.

He added he felt ‘very sorry’ for Mr Dymond and claims the programme ‘ruins lives’.

Mr Henson said his family apologised to him after the golf clubs were found a few months later, but that it has taken four years to completely repair the wounds between them.

In a statement, ITV defended its aftercare procedures and said it maintained its duty of care towards guests. 

The father-of-three, pictured on the show in 2015, said the programme 'ruins lives'

The father-of-three, pictured on the show in 2015, said the programme ‘ruins lives’

The statement said: ‘ITV has many years experience of broadcasting and creating programmes featuring members of the public and each of our productions has duty of care measures in place for contributors. 

‘These will be dependent on the type of show and will be proportionate for the level of activity of each contributor and upon the individual. All of our processes are regularly reviewed to ensure that they are fit for purpose in an ever changing landscape.

‘In the case of The Jeremy Kyle Show, the programme has significant and detailed duty of care processes in place for contributors pre, during and post show which have been built up over 14 years, and there have been numerous positive outcomes from this, including people who have resolved complex and long-standing personal problems.

‘Prior to the show a comprehensive assessment is carried out by the guest welfare team on all potential contributors. The guest welfare team consists of four members of staff, one consultant psychotherapist and three mental health nurses.

Mr Henson, right, said it has taken him years to reforge relationships with his family, including brother Charlie, left

Mr Henson, right, said it has taken him years to reforge relationships with his family, including brother Charlie, left

‘The guests are interviewed by guest welfare face to face at studios and prior to filming. Throughout filming the participants are supported by the guest welfare team in the studios during the recording phase of their show. After filming has ended all guests are seen by a member of the guest welfare team to ensure they are feeling calm and emotionally settled before any participant leaves to travel home.

Mr Henson, pictured, claimed the aftercare was poor and said he was 'put in a taxi' and offered '10 minutes with a psychologist'

Mr Henson, pictured, claimed the aftercare was poor and said he was ‘put in a taxi’ and offered ’10 minutes with a psychologist’

‘An evaluation of their needs is also carried out at this time and should they require any ongoing service regarding the problem they discussed on the show then appropriate solutions are found for them. This could include residential rehabilitation, counselling, anger management, family mediation, child access mediation or couple counselling for example.

‘The day after recording of the show the participant will be contacted by production to carry out a welfare check and provide details of the services that have been sourced for them. The production team keep in touch with the participants in the days between recording and transmission and participants are given a production mobile contact number should they need to contact the show at any point following transmission.

‘To continue best practice, we regularly review our processes.

‘As we have said, everyone at ITV and The Jeremy Kyle Show is shocked and saddened at the news of the death of a participant in the show a week after the recording of the episode they featured in and our thoughts are with their family and friends. We will not screen the episode in which they featured.

‘Given the seriousness of this event, ITV has also decided to suspend both filming and broadcasting of The Jeremy Kyle Show with immediate effect in order to give it time to conduct a review of this episode of the show, and we cannot comment further until this review is completed.’

For confidential support call the Samaritans on 116123, or visit a local Samaritans branch. See samaritans.org 

Gulf War veteran says he considered suicide after he was branded ‘a disgrace’ in ‘kangaroo court’ Jeremy Kyle Show he was told would be a reunion with his estranged daughter

By LARA KEAY FOR MAILONLINE 

A Gulf War veteran suffering from PTSD says he considered suicide after being ‘made to feel like a scumbag’ on the Jeremy Kyle Show.

Fergus Kenny, 49, agreed to go on the ITV programme in 2016 after his estranged daughter Hayleigh said she would take part in a reunion show.

He turned up at the studio expecting an emotional reunion with his daughter but says it quickly descended into a ‘kangaroo court’ where the host accused him of abandoning his family.

Mr Kenny, who served during the Gulf War and in Iraq and Bosnia, was mercilessly booed and branded a ‘disgrace by the presenter. 

The father-of-three says he felt extremely low after going on the show and considered taking his own life. 

He wants to share his story following the death of Steven Dymond – 10 days after he appeared on Jeremy Kyle. 

Mr Dymond failed a lie detector test on the show and seemingly took his own life shortly after the episode was filmed.

Fergus Kenny, 49, appeared on the Jeremy Kyle Show in 2016 to be reunited with his then 19-year-old daughter Hayleigh who he hadn't seen in years because of his Army career

Fergus Kenny, 49, appeared on the Jeremy Kyle Show in 2016 to be reunited with his then 19-year-old daughter Hayleigh who he hadn’t seen in years because of his Army career 

ITV  has now cancelled the daytime talks how until a full investigation is carried out.  

Mr Kenny, from Coalville, Leicestershire, said: ‘If it hadn’t been for my kids I would have killed myself. It was that bad.

‘I had been led to believe by the producers that it was going to be a reunion show with my daughter but it turned into a kangaroo court.

‘I felt like I was having my whole character assassinated and was being made to look like a scumbag. It was a set up.

‘After the show ended I felt extremely low. I didn’t know at the time but I was actually suffering from PTSD from my time in the military.

The father-of-three (pictured today) who now lives in Coalville, Leicestershire, says he felt suicidal after being on TV

The father-of-three (pictured today) who now lives in Coalville, Leicestershire, says he felt suicidal after being on TV 

‘If I had known then what I know now I would never have agreed to go on the show.

‘I’m afraid I’m not surprised someone has died in an apparent suicide. The show makes entertainment out of people’s misery and heartache.

‘I had problems and was in a marriage which was not ideal but I certainly didn’t deserve the treatment I got on the show.’

On the show, Mr Kenny met up with his then 19-year-old daughter Hayleigh after years apart as he pursued his military career.

Following the harrowing experience he split up with his wife Crissy, who also blamed Kyle for ‘ruining her marriage’.

Mr Kenny (pictured in Basra in 2006), who served during the Gulf War and in Iraq and Bosnia, was mercilessly booed and branded a 'disgrace by Jeremy Kyle when he went on his show in 2016

Mr Kenny (pictured in Basra in 2006), who served during the Gulf War and in Iraq and Bosnia, was mercilessly booed and branded a ‘disgrace by Jeremy Kyle when he went on his show in 2016 

She claims he came back home a ‘different person’  

Her ex-husband was a corporal in the Queen’s Royal Irish Hussars and served 15 years, including fighting in Iraq in 2006.

Following the harrowing experience he split up with his wife Crissy (pictured), who also blamed Kyle for 'ruining her marriage'

Following the harrowing experience he split up with his wife Crissy (pictured), who also blamed Kyle for ‘ruining her marriage’

He was injured in the conflict and left the military in 2007 after spending 18 months in rehabilitation. 

He said: ‘I saw the kids twice in the ten years between finishing in Iraq and going on Jeremy Kyle.

‘Once I went on holiday with them to Wales and another I took the twins to the Army v Navy rugby game at Twickenham. We had the occasional text message and phone call.’

He was contacted by the show’s producers after Hayleigh agreed to appear for a reunion show.

But Kyle demanded to know: ‘Why didn’t you see your kid? Why didn’t you cry yourself to sleep every night?

‘Look at your daughter, you have failed her. You don’t deserve your daughter, pal.’

Mr Kenny said: ‘I didn’t realise what was going on with the show. It was supposed to be a family reunion.

Mr Kenny (pictured on the programme in 2016) wants to share his story following the death of Steven Dymond - 10 days after he appeared on Jeremy Kyle

Mr Kenny (pictured on the programme in 2016) wants to share his story following the death of Steven Dymond – 10 days after he appeared on Jeremy Kyle

‘Jeremy Kyle absolutely ripped me apart. He said ‘You cannot use the Army as an excuse’.

Steven Dymond died 10 days after appearing on Jeremy Kyle

Steven Dymond died 10 days after appearing on Jeremy Kyle 

‘He did not even consider I might have mental health issues, he just tried to get me into a fight.

‘When the show was over I was promised after care but I got nothing.

‘I was just put in a room with my daughter and we managed to fix things.

‘After the show I just wanted the ground to swallow me up. If it wasn’t for my kids I would have ended it.

‘I am relieved the show has been taken off the air and I hope it never comes back. 

‘Mental health is a serious subject and this show exploits the most vulnerable.’

Months after the show aired, Mr Kenny was officially diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Now he volunteers for the charity Once, We Were Soldiers, which helps veterans who become homeless. 

For confidential support call the Samaritans on 116123, or visit a local Samaritans branch. See samaritans.org 

Former security guard whose life fell apart after head-butting a love rival on the Jeremy Kyle show in what a judge blasted as ‘human bear baiting’ reveals ‘underhand tricks’ producers used to wind him up

By ROSS SLATER FOR MAILONLINE 

David Staniforth, (pictured) now 57, had just gone through a bitter break-up from his wife of 26 years when he was emotionally blackmailed by his own daughter into appearing on the show

David Staniforth, (pictured) now 57, had just gone through a bitter break-up from his wife of 26 years when he was emotionally blackmailed by his own daughter into appearing on the show

A former security guard whose life fell apart after he head-butted a love rival on the Jeremy Kyle Show has revealed the underhand tricks used by producers to bring out the very worst in their guests.

David Staniforth, now 57, had just gone through a bitter break-up from his wife of 26 years when he was emotionally blackmailed by his own daughter into appearing on the show.

It ended with him pleading guilty to common assault. The magistrates, who were shown footage from the show, said he had been, ‘highly provoked’ and that the producers of the show should be in the dock with him.

The show was referred to as a ‘human form of bear baiting’ by one of the magistrates who sentenced him.

Mr Staniforth, from Clowne, Derbyshire, a father-of-two, said he was never offered counselling after the show.

Speaking to MailOnline, he said: ‘My wife had left the family home after 26 years of marriage and our daughter, then in her early twenties, wanted answers.

‘Her mum had told her certain things about me and she didn’t know what to believe, so she rang up Jeremy Kyle.

David Staniforth headbutted Larry Mahoney on the Jeremy Kyle Show. Mr Staniforth's life fell apart after appearing on the show

David Staniforth headbutted Larry Mahoney on the Jeremy Kyle Show. Mr Staniforth’s life fell apart after appearing on the show

‘I then got four or five phone calls from the show producers and I told them straight, ‘I don’t wish to wash my dirty laundry in public. I’m not interested.’.

‘But I was very vulnerable. I was still in love with Jennifer at the time and had just found out that, behind my back, she had been seeing a man called Larry Mahoney who was our lodger and a good friend of mine.

‘The producers did not leave me alone. They rang me up and said, ‘Do you still love your wife? Would you do anything to get her back?

‘They told me they had been speaking to Jennifer and that she wanted to explain everything, to apologise to me and ask me to take her back. I just needed to go on the show.

‘I wasn’t stupid. I knew this wasn’t going to happen and in the end it was my daughter who talked me into doing it.

‘Her mum had said that I had been unfaithful which I knew I hadn’t. She said she wanted me to go on a take the lie detector test. She said Larry was going on and that if I didn’t she’d think I was less of a man.

‘I told her I would do it for her but not to hold me responsible for my actions.’

Larry Mahoney (pictured left) and Jennifer Staniforth (pictured right) who also appeared on the show

Larry Mahoney (pictured left) and Jennifer Staniforth (pictured right) who also appeared on the show

The build-up to the show involved guests being collected from their homes in taxis and taken to an assortment of salubrious hotels in Manchester, close to the Granada studios.

There they were asked to sign agreements that if there was any alcohol abuse, drug abuse or physical abuse of staff they would be sent home.

Hotel staff were notified of who was a Jeremy Kyle show guest and instructed not to serve them alcohol on the night before filming.

‘At the studio I was put into a room with a security guard outside it and left to wait. Eventually Jeremy Kyle came in and introduced himself.

‘He came across as the nicest guy in the world. He told me that he knew how difficult break-ups could be and that his only role was to air both sides of the story.

‘He seemed fine to me but as soon as the cameras started rolling he was a totally different person.

‘I later found out through my ex-wife that I was being totally manipulated. Unbeknown to me, Kyle had asked her how bad my temper was.

‘When she said it was very bad, they told her that they would like to prove this so my family and friends could see how bad I was.

‘They asked her how best to wind me up and she told them that I didn’t like being called names, I did not like being called a liar and that I didn’t like people getting into my face pointing their fingers.’

As soon as Mr Staniforth was put in front of the cameras, the goading started.

‘The first thing he said to me was, ‘Right then Davy boy’. I didn’t like that. It was so patronising and I felt like walking off straight away.

‘He heard what I had to say and just kept calling me a liar. Whatever I said, he would twist it to mean something else and I was getting so frustrated.

‘Then Jennifer came in and started telling more lies about me and then they brought in Larry.

‘Now he is not an aggressive man but they had wound him up and told him to walk over to me pointing his finger and calling me a liar.

‘I could not take it. This was a friend who had done what he had done with my wife and now he was coming at me calling me a liar.

‘It was too much. Jeremy Kyle had got just what he wanted. I head-butted him and blood started pouring from his nose. I have never head-butted anyone before or since.

‘People have asked me why the show’s bouncers were so far away from us and why they delayed their reaction. I guess it was to get better footage.’

Mr Staniforth never got to take the lie detector test. He went home and a few weeks later was arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm.

When it reached court, he pleaded guilty to common assault and was fined £320 by magistrates.

The show was called ‘human form of bear baiting’ by one of the magistrates who sentenced him.

‘They actually said that I had been badly provoked and that the show’s producers should be in the dock with me,’ said Mr Staniforth.

The consequences of his appearance in March 2007 did not end there. His temper loss meant he was stripped of his Security Industry licence so lost his job.

He then applied to be a bus driver but despite passing the practical and theory tests, was told his criminal record meant he was unsafe to work with the public.

The same thing happened when he applied for a taxi licence.

Mr Stanforth, who has worked in a warehouse since, added: ‘The effect it had on my life was very bad indeed. It cost me my job and my chance at doing two other jobs I had in mind.

‘Jeremy Kyle moulds people and gets into their heads. He gets them to say what he wants them to say and gets a kick out of manipulating people.

‘It gives him a sense of power. He finds out peoples’ weak points and exploits them. He simply pours petrol on any situation and sits back and watches the flames.

‘I feel very sorry for the family and friends of the man who has taken his own life and if it is proven that he did what he did because of the show then Kyle and his producers should be held responsible.

‘I don’t think it should continue. Kyle should find a proper job and stop winding up vulnerable people.

‘My wife and I used to watch it regularly, but now I can’t help thinking that those taking a delight in the misfortune of others must have something missing from their own lives.

‘The show is just all about enraging people – those taking part and those watching. It has definitely had its day.’ 

What will replace The Jeremy Kyle Show in ITV’s schedule? 

The permanent cancellation of The Jeremy Kyle Show leaves an hour-long slot in ITV’s daytime schedule, prompting fans to ponder what will fill the gap.

The tabloid talk show – which has been axed after 14 years following the death of guest Steve Dymond a week after he recorded an episode – aired from 9.25am until 10.30am on weekdays between Lorraine and This Morning.

ITV said that a replacement for the programme will be announced in due course, but there has been speculation from viewers over what that could be.

The show has si far been replaced with antiques programme Dickinson's Real Deal

The show has si far been replaced with antiques programme Dickinson’s Real Deal

Since The Jeremy Kyle Show was first pulled from the schedule on Monday, it has been replaced with antiques programme Dickinson’s Real Deal.

The show, hosted by David Dickinson, sees members of the public have their antique and collectables assessed by independent valuers, before they are then tempted with offers from dealers.

However, it is unclear if it will become a permanent replacement, as it regularly airs mid-afternoon.

Trisha Goddard is also tipped to return to the channel with her own talk show.

Goddard’s show Trisha – which focused on helping members of the public with their various personal issues using a lie-detector and DNA tests – aired from 1998 until 2004 in the mid-morning slot on ITV before she moved to Channel 5.

Kyle’s programme first aired in 2005 as a replacement for Goddard’s show.

Trisha Goddard is also tipped to return to the channel with her own talk show

Trisha Goddard is also tipped to return to the channel with her own talk show

Trisha ended on Channel 5 in 2010, but there have been calls from viewers for her to return to ITV.

Others on Twitter have suggested a new programme could be commissioned to help people dealing with mental health issues.

One person tweeted: ‘You know what would be a great replacement for the Jeremy Kyle show? A show that offers real world advice for those suffering from mental health issues.’

A talk show similar to Kyle’s could be another option for ITV, but with a new host.

Vanessa Feltz, who regularly appears on This Morning to help viewers with their love life dilemmas, is one potential candidate, as well as Loose Women presenter Christine Lampard, who is a regular guest host on Lorraine.

Some viewers have proposed classic game shows to fill the slot, including Supermarket Sweep – which is tipped to return to TV with Rylan Clark-Neal as host – and ITV’s Tenable, which is currently hosted by Warwick Davis.

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