Jessi Combs is killed in a high speed jet car crash

‘Fastest woman on four wheels’ and MythBusters host Jessi Combs, 39, is killed in a high speed JET-CAR crash while trying to beat her own women’s land-speed record of 398mph on a dry lake bed in Oregon

  • Jessi Combs, 39, was killed in a jet-powered car crash on the Alvord Desert in Oregon on Tuesday afternoon
  • Combs was trying to break her own women’s land speed record at the time 
  • She joined the North American Eagle Supersonic Speed Challenger team as driver back in 2013
  • Just days before her death, Combs had posted on Instagram acknowledging her quest to break 512mph and said people called her crazy
  • The exact details of the crash have not yet been released but her family said she was surrounded by loved ones when she died 
  • Her partner Terry Madden said he was first on the scene and did everything he could to save her
  • She hosted various automotive shows and also appeared as a host and builder on Discovery Channel’s Mythbusters

Professional driver and TV host Jessi Combs has died after crashing her jet-powered car while trying to break her own women’s land speed record. 

The 39-year-old was killed in the crash on Tuesday at about 4pm on a dry bed lake in Alvord Desert in Oregon.

Combs, dubbed the fastest woman on four wheels, was pursuing a land speed record for women in the North American Eagle.

The TV personality, who broke the 398mph record in 2013, joined the North American Eagle Supersonic Speed Challenger team as driver that same year. 

She managed to hit 483 miles per hour in a shakedown run on the same 13-mile course in 2016 but it ended prematurely due to mechanical issues. 

Combs was driving the same North American Eagle Supersonic Speed Challenger she has used in previous attempts. 

Jessi Combs was killed on Tuesday after crashing her jet car while trying to break her own women's land speed record in Oregon

Jessi Combs was killed on Tuesday after crashing her jet car while trying to break her own women’s land speed record in Oregon

The exact details of the crash have not yet been released but her family said she was surrounded by loved ones when she died.

Her family said she had been chasing her dream to become the fastest woman on Earth since 2012.  

‘Combs was one of the rare dreamers with the bravery to turn those possibilities into reality and she left this earth driving faster than any other woman in history,’ they said in a statement.

Just days before her death, Combs had posted on Instagram acknowledging her quest to break 512mph.

‘It may seem a little crazy to walk directly into the line of fire… those who are willing, are those who achieve great things. People say I’m crazy. I say thank you,’ she wrote, adding the hashtags #gottabreak512 #aimingfor619. 

Her partner Terry Madden confirmed news of the horrific accident in an Instagram tribute post on Wednesday, saying he did everything he could to save her. 

‘I was the first one there and trust me we did everything humanly possible to save her,’ Madden wrote.  

‘I have never loved or been loved by anyone as much as this amazing woman she was truly my unicorn and I enjoyed every single minute that I had with her. 

‘She was the most amazing spirit that I have ever or will ever know. 

‘I’m not okay but she is right here keeping my going. I made her a promise that if this didn’t go well that I would make sure and do good with it.’ 

Combs, dubbed the fastest woman on four wheels, was trying to beat her land speed record of 398 miles per hour, which she set in 2013

Combs, dubbed the fastest woman on four wheels, was trying to beat her land speed record of 398 miles per hour, which she set in 2013

The 39-year-old was killed in the crash on Tuesday at about 4pm on a dry bed lake in Alvord Desert in Oregon

The 39-year-old was killed in the crash on Tuesday at about 4pm on a dry bed lake in Alvord Desert in Oregon

Just days before her death, Combs had posted on Instagram (above) acknowledging her quest to break 512mph

Just days before her death, Combs had posted on Instagram (above) acknowledging her quest to break 512mph

Her family paid tribute to Combs saying she was known for her ‘bright smile, positivity and tenacious pursuit of the fulfillment of her dreams’.

‘Her drive was infectious and she served as a role model for young girls and women around the world. 

‘People that loved her and followed her became family, all bonded together by adventure and passion. Her fans adored her and she lived to inspire them.

‘Surrounded by her family and friends at the time of her passing, Jessi lived fearlessly and her legacy lives on in the countless lives she touched.’   

Born in Rapid City, South Dakota, Combs had a lifelong dream to become a race car driver.

She graduated from WyoTech in Wyoming with a degree in Custom Automotive Fabrication and eventually fell into television. 

She hosted various automotive shows, including Xtreme 4×4, Overhaulin’, Truck U, and Two Guys Garage.

Combs had previously also appeared as a host and builder on Discovery Channel’s Mythbusters.

Her family said they were planning a celebration of her life and vowed to set up a foundation to continue her efforts to empower women and young girls.   

The exact details of the crash have not yet been released but her family said she was surrounded by loved ones when she died. Combs is pictured above in Oregon during a test session in 2016

The exact details of the crash have not yet been released but her family said she was surrounded by loved ones when she died. Combs is pictured above in Oregon during a test session in 2016

Her family said she had been chasing her dream to become the fastest woman on Earth since 2012

Her family said she had been chasing her dream to become the fastest woman on Earth since 2012

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