Extinction Rebellion demonstrators douse stage a ‘die in’ at London Fashion Week

Demonstrators descend on London Fashion Week as animal rights campaigners PETA cover themselves in paint and ‘blood-soaked’ Extinction Rebellion protesters glue themselves to an entrance

  • Extinction Rebellion doused themselves in fake blood and staged a ‘die in’ at London Fashion Week
  • The five-day long international event is due to kick off in London’s Strand this morning 
  • But in advance eco-protestors covered the pavement with red liquid and laid down for press photographers
  • They shouted: ‘You choose profit over planet, profit over people, profit over our future’

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Extinction Rebellion eco-protesters covered in fake blood have glued themselves to an entrance to London Fashion Week which begins today.

And in a separate protest at the same venue demonstrators from animal rights group PETA have protested the use of leather by covering themselves in a black oily substance they have called ‘toxic slime’ and are holding up signs reading: ‘Leather is a dirty business’

The People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (Peta) supporters say they are highlighting the ‘leather industry’s planet-poisoning waste’. 

London Fashion Week kicked off this morning in The Strand in London and will run until Tuesday to showcase new designs from the world’s leading fashion houses.

PETA protesters covered themselves in slime to demonstrate against the use of leather, at the start of London Fashion Week

PETA protesters covered themselves in slime to demonstrate against the use of leather, at the start of London Fashion Week

The protestors held up signs in the shape of the emblem which denotes a garment is made of real leather, reading: 'Leather is a dirty business'

The protestors held up signs in the shape of the emblem which denotes a garment is made of real leather, reading: ‘Leather is a dirty business’

PETA protesters

PETA protesters

The campaign group has previously thrown fake blood at runway models wearing fur on catwalks at fashion shows

Around a dozen PETA protestors posed for photographs outside London Fashion Week on a mat protecting the pavement from their 'toxic slime'

Around a dozen PETA protestors posed for photographs outside London Fashion Week on a mat protecting the pavement from their ‘toxic slime’

Pictures posted by Extinction Rebellion on Friday morning show activists blocking doors to the trade show venue in The Strand, while others poured buckets of fake blood around the entrance to create a ‘bleeding red carpet’.

Protesters were led away by police shouting: ‘You choose profit over planet, profit over people, profit over our future.’ 

The environmental campaign movement said it was staging the so-called ‘die-in’ to urge the fashion industry to ‘tell the truth about its contribution to the climate and ecological crisis’.

The protesters, wearing white clothes with red blood stains, were photographed holding hands and carrying flags.

Extinction Rebellion said the protest marked the start of five days of action targeting the fashion industry which had ‘blood on its hands’ due to its environmental record.

Five members of Extinction Rebellion lay down on the 'blood'-soaked pavement today in front of press photographers

Five members of Extinction Rebellion lay down on the ‘blood’-soaked pavement today in front of press photographers

This woman has painted red 'blood' on her face and clothes to join the protest at the launch of London Fashion Week

This woman has painted red ‘blood’ on her face and clothes to join the protest at the launch of London Fashion Week

Extinction Rebellion activist Sara Arnold, 32, who is the founder of a fashion rental company, said: ‘Instead of the fashion industry exploiting sustainability to sustain business as usual, it should use its influence and creativity to sustain life on Earth.

‘The industry is set to grow by 63 per cent between now and 2030. It is time for it to admit that it has failed to make itself sustainable.

‘The fashion industry’s footprint grows season after season. It has now run out of time. We must act now.’

Extinction Rebellion said the fashion industry is one of the most polluting industries in the world, with a carbon footprint more than that of international flights and shipping combined.

The Extinction Rebellion members waved flags across the entrance to London Fashion Week in The Strand in London

The Extinction Rebellion members waved flags across the entrance to London Fashion Week in The Strand in London

Protestors wearing white and waving flags held hand across the entrance to London Fashion Week which starts today

Protestors wearing white and waving flags held hand across the entrance to London Fashion Week which starts today

Extinction Rebellion said the five days of action targeting the fashion industry will come ahead of an International Rebellion beginning on October 7, which will see cities across the globe call for immediate action on the climate and ecological crisis.

A spokeswoman for the event refused to comment.

The group told the British Fashion Council (BFC) this summer they wanted it to scrap London Fashion Week in favour of a summit to address the climate crisis attended by industry professionals.

Given the ecological consequences of fast fashion and the impact London Fashion Week has on consumption, the organisation says a boycott is the only way forward to help save our planet.

It would make more sense to target high street high street retailers who produce the ‘fast fashion’ which fills landfills, but Bel Jacobs of Extinction Rebellion told The Independent: ‘We do not have time to chat about incremental change with high street labels.’

Shows and clothes which were spattered with the red liquid can be seen on protestors in The Strand

Shows and clothes which were spattered with the red liquid can be seen on protestors in The Strand

Young protestors laid on the ground this morning wearing t-shirts which read 'Repair, Rewear, Rebel' and 'Beyond Fashion'

Young protestors laid on the ground this morning wearing t-shirts which read ‘Repair, Rewear, Rebel’ and ‘Beyond Fashion’

She went on: ‘London Fashion Week is a symbolic moment in the fashion calendar and a platform that could reach millions, alerting them to the true urgency of the climate crisis.’

She claimed change needs to come from the top down and identified online retailers Boohoo and Missguided as two of the least sustainable fashion brands in the UK despite their soaring profits. 

‘But we also believe that in times of crisis, culture must lead the way,’ she says. ‘The London fashion scene has long been a place of innovation and dynamic creative problem solving. It also sets a global precedent and there is nothing more pressing, globally than the climate emergency.’ 

In order to get their message across, the activists will be taking part in several protests – which they call ‘swarms’ – during the five-day event. 

The protests will culminate in an ‘RIP London Fashion Week Funeral March’ on Tuesday 17 September, which will begin in Trafalgar Square at 6pm.  

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