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    Emotional moment NHS nurse, 59, is applauded by her colleagues

    Emotional moment NHS nurse, 59, is applauded by her colleagues lined up along a hospital corridor as she leaves intensive care after beating coronavirus

    • Millie Magadlela was admitted to the ICU at the University Hospital of North Tees
    • She was on ventilator for three days before she was transferred back to her ward
    • Ms Magadlela was discharged from hospital two days later making a recovery
    • Learn more about how to help people impacted by COVID

    An NHS nurse was applauded by her colleagues who lined up along a hospital corridor as she left intensive care after beating coronavirus

    Millie Magadlela, 59, spent three days on a ventilator in the critical unit at the University Hospital of North Tees after she tested positive for the virus.

    She became the first coronavirus at the hospital in Stockton to be discharged from the unit after being put on a ventilator when she was transferred back to the general ward on Saturday.

    In a clip, NHS staff are seen clapping and cheering as Ms Magadlela is wheeled through a corridor and out of the intensive care unit.

    In a clip, NHS staff are seen clapping and cheering as Millie Magadlela is wheeled through a corridor and out of the intensive care unit.

    The nurse, who works in the surgical decision unit at the hospital, blows kisses back to staff on the ward as she bids farewell in the emotional video. 

    Ms Magadlela was discharged from the hospital on Monday – two days after she returned to the general ward from the ICU.     

    She said: ‘I can’t say in words how it felt to have all of the staff there clapping and showing their support and love.

    ‘These people all saved my life. I am here now only because of them. I felt so loved and cared for by everyone. And that includes all staff across the organisation who treated me.’

    Ms Magadlela, who has worked as a nurse for 39 years, said she began feeling unwell on Sunday, March 29.

    She described feeling tired and lethargic with a high temperature when she returned home from her shift.

    The nurse spent the next few days self-isolating at her home in Stockton with her 59-year-old husband Mongezi Spencer, who works as a plater.

    But her symptoms worsened and she soon developed more painful aches in her knees and lower back. She also experienced cramp and abdominal pain.

    Pictured: Millie Magadlela (left) with another member of staff at the University Hospital of North Tees

    Pictured: Millie Magadlela (left) with another member of staff at the University Hospital of North Tees

    Ms Magadlela said: ‘I was so tired and lacking in energy that I couldn’t even wash myself for two days. I was hot and cold, with blankets on top of me. I felt awful.’

    She telephoned the NHS 111 service who sent an ambulance to her home. She was then taken to the University Hospital of North Tees where she was assessed in emergency care.

    Ms Magadlela was soon transferred to the emergency assessment unit and then to the respiratory unit before finally being moved to the ICU.

    While the nurse was on a ventilator, NHS staff worked tirelessly to save her life.

    She said: ‘I can’t properly thank all of the staff for what they have done for me.

    ‘In my 39 years as a nurse I have never been in hospital as a patient – I’ve always been fit and healthy.

    ‘I’ve always had a passion and determination to do my best for my patients. So to see things from a patient’s view was very different.’

    She now plans to spend time recovering at home. She aims to build up her strength and energy through breathing exercises so she can return to the front line.

    Ms Magadlela said: ‘I’m very proud to be a nurse and so proud to work for the NHS.

    ‘The message I want to get to everyone is just how important it is for people to follow the advice and stay at home.

    ‘Anyone can catch it and get sick. I am proof of that – I’m someone who exercises regularly and looks after my health.

    ‘Stay at home so our amazing NHS staff can continue to save lives like my own.’

    Stephanie Gale and Tracey Oldfield, clinical co-ordinators in critical care, added: ‘Staff were overjoyed to see Millie make a recovery and become our first patient to be discharged from the unit after being on a ventilator.

    ‘It has given staff a huge morale boost at such an important time. Staff are working tirelessly to do everything they can for every patient they treat – not just in the critical care unit but across the organisation.’

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