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    TikTok video reveals EXACTLY how single mothers can do a ‘DIY insemination’

    The DIY guide to making a baby: Single mother goes viral with TikTok video revealing EXACTLY how to do your own insemination ‘without a man or a doctor’ using mail order donor sperm

    • Single mother Dani Morin, of Newport Beach, California, shared a TikTok video 
    • Revealed how women can inseminate themselves at home with donor sperm
    • Explained it involved finding a sperm bank and using a syringe to do it at home 

    A pregnant woman has gone viral on TiKTok with a video showing single mothers exactly how they can inseminate themselves at home. 

    California-based Dani Morin, who used the method herself, explained women can carry out the procedure, known as intrauterine insemination, using mail order sperm from a donor bank, a syringe and a menstrual disc bought from a local drug store. 

    The video, shared last month, has been viewed more than eight million times and has received more then 1.2million likes. The majority of viewers praised Dani for sharing her story, saying it was ‘inspiring’ and ‘really helpful’.

    Viral sensation: California-based Dani Morin, who used the method herself, explained women can carry out the procedure, known as intrauterine insemination, using mail order sperm from a donor bank, a syringe and a menstrual disc bought from a local drug store

    Dani explained a vial of sperm cost her around $800 and $200 to post,

    The sperm was delivered to Dani in a cryogenic tank, right, which is used to store frozen biological material

    Dani explained a vial of sperm cost her around $800 and $200 to post, left. The sperm was delivered to Dani in a cryogenic tank, right, which is used to store frozen biological material

    However medical experts have warned there can be some complications if the procedure is carried out at home rather than in a fertility clinic. 

    These include a less accurate tracking of the ovulation cycle and potential issues with the sperm. 

    Speaking on the video, titled DIY Making A Baby, Dani recommended starting by taking fertility supplements and checking with a financial adviser that you are definitely in a position to have a child. 

    She then found a sperm bank. A vial cost around $800 and postage $200, although prices vary from state to state and differ significantly in the UK. For example, sperm from The London Sperm Bank costs about £950.

    The equipment used by Dani for the procedure, including a syringe (center) and personal lubricant (left) to ease the insertion

    The equipment used by Dani for the procedure, including a syringe (center) and personal lubricant (left) to ease the insertion 

    The sperm was delivered to Dani in a cryogenic tank, which is used to store frozen biological material. 

    She advised women should began tracking their ovulation every three hours and begin the insemination process 12 hours after they receive the first positive result.

    The sperm is transferred to a syringe which is inserted into the body ‘like a tampon’. 

    Dani explained she lay on her back with her feet in the air for 30 minutes to ‘chill’ before inserting a menstrual disc, because it helps keep the sperm close to the entrance of the uterus for longer. 

    A menstrual disc is similar to a mentstrual cup, but sits higher up where the vaginal canal meets the cervix. 

    What is intrauterine insemination?

    Intrauterine insemination (IUI) is a fertility treatment that involves directly inserting sperm into a woman’s womb. It can be carried out using a partner’s or a donor’s sperm.

    Who can use IUI 

    People who might want to use IUI include: 

    Single mothers

    • Couples in a same-sex relationship 
    • Those who are unable to have vaginal sex – for example, because of a physical disability or psychosexual problem
    • Those who have a condition that means you need specific help to conceive. For example, if one of you has HIV and it’s not safe to have unprotected sex 

    Does it work?  

    To increase your chances of success, a cycle of IUI should be done just after ovulation. Ovulation usually happens 12 to 16 days before your next period. This can vary if you have an irregular menstrual cycle. 

    Chances of success depends on lots of different things, including:

    • the cause of infertility
    • the woman’s age
    • the man’s sperm count and sperm quality (using fresh sperm leads to higher conception rates than using frozen sperm)
    • whether fertility medicines are used to stimulate ovulation (this can increase your chances of success) 

    The risks 

    Some women have mild cramps similar to period pains, but otherwise the risks involved with IUI are minimal. Medical advice broadly agrees that the procedure is safest when carried out at a fertility clinic or similar. 

    Source: NHS 

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    As little as two weeks later, women can have a positive pregnancy test. 

    However while the process sounds simple on Dani’s video, medical experts have warned there are risks for women to consider. 

    The Human Fertilisation and Empbryology Authority warned having the procedure carried out in a clinic is the safest way to ensure the semen has been properly checked. 

    There can also be legal ramifications regarding the parental responsibility of the sperm donor.

    As little as two weeks later, women can have a positive pregnancy test, as seen above

    As little as two weeks later, women can have a positive pregnancy test, as seen above

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