Quantcast

Mark Wright’s father asks his son and Michelle Keegan to have a child

<!-- 'It's about time you made me a grandad!' Mark Wright's father BEGS...
More

    FBI agents are seen investigating plot of land owned by Colorado mom Suzanne Morphew’s husband

    EXCLUSIVE: FBI and CSI are seen preparing to dig up plot of land owned by Colorado mom Suzanne Morphew's husband where dogs detected the...

    An Editor’s Note on the Trump Tax Investigation

    Today we are publishing the results of an examination of decades of personal and corporate tax records for President Trump and his businesses in...

    Former pro surfer Ellie-Jean Coffey defends decision to sell nudes online

    'Anyone who succeeds in life is criticised': Former professional surfer Ellie-Jean Coffey defends decision to sell her nude photos online as she boasts about...

    Missing mother found off the coast of Colombia

    Woman is found floating alive in the sea two years after losing contact with her family: Mother who fled 'abusive' husband says God saved...

    Trump end run around Congress raises questions on his claims

    BRIDGEWATER, N.J. (AP) — President Donald Trump’s end run around Congress on coronavirus relief is raising questions about whether it would give Americans the economic lifeline he claims and appears certain to face legal challenges. Democrats called it a pre-election ploy that would burden cash-strapped states.

    “When you look at those executive orders … he doesn’t know what he’s talking about or something is wrong there,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said. “To characterize them to even accomplishing what they set out to as something that will take the place of an agreement is just not so.”

    ADVERTISEMENT

    After negotiations with lawmakers on the next package of pandemic economic assistance hit a wall, Trump used what he said were the inherent powers of the presidency to forge ahead on tax and spending policy that Congress says it is granted by the Constitution.

    Trump asserted he had the authority to defer payroll taxes and extend an expired unemployment benefit, although at a lower amount than what the jobless had been getting during the crisis. His reelection chances imperiled by the pandemic, the president contended his orders “will take care of pretty much this entire situation, as we know it.”

    But the orders appeared to carry less weight than Trump promoted and cut federal relief spending by shifting more onto the shoulders of struggling states. Critics said the actions crossed a legal line and fell well short of what is needed to help right the fragile economy.

    Youtube video thumbnail

    “Paltry,” said Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer of New York, given the scope of the economic and health crises.

    Though certain to further strain relations with Congress, the moves were framed by the White House as the president breaking through the Washington gridlock in order to directly distribute aid. Advisers hope it will sustain an economic recovery that Trump likely needs to defeat Democrat Joe Biden in November.

    With an eye on reversing his slide in the polls, Trump took full credit for the measures, which he signed at his New Jersey golf club on Saturday after congressional talks broke down this past week. Democrats initially sought a $3.4 trillion package, but said they lowered their demand to $2 trillion. Republicans had proposed a $1 trillion plan.

    Trump accused Democrats of trying to spend more than was needed and adding money for priorities unrelated to the pandemic. He said local aid amounted to “bailout money” for states and cities “badly run by Democrats for many years. … And we’re not willing to do that.”

    ADVERTISEMENT

    The president wants to continue paying a supplemental federal unemployment benefit for millions of Americans put out of work during the outbreak. But his order called for up to $400 payments each week, compared with the $600 that people had been receiving.

    Trump also said states would cover 25 percent of this money even as many are dealing with major budget shortfalls. The federal contribution would be redirected from disaster relief money at the Federal Emergency Management Agency — dollars not likely to last more than two months.

    Trump’s top economic adviser, Larry Kudlow, struggled during a television interview Sunday to clearly explain the specifics of his boss’s order on unemployment aid. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said the $100 share from states would come from from an earlier pool of federal money and that Trump may waive the requirement about how it can be used.

    “Look, that would cost us about $500 million dollars between now and the end of the year,” said Gov. Ned Lamont, D-Conn. “I could take that money from testing. I don’t think that’s a great idea. I could take that money from, you know, mass disinfecting for our schools. I don’t think that’s a great idea. In fact, I think the president’s plan is not a great idea.”

    Pelosi, D-Calif., criticized Trump for not doing anything to help schools trying to reopen and she said the orders were “unconstitutional slop.”

    Trump also acted to defer payment of the payroll tax, a long-pushed goal that had little support from either party on Capitol Hill, and federal student loans. His order on housing is not a guarantee against eviction, as he claimed, but instead directs the departments of the Treasury and Housing and Urban Development to identify money that could help those struggling to pay their monthly rent.

    Trump said the employee portion of the payroll tax would be deferred from Aug. 1 through the end of the year, and he raised the possibility of making it permanent, though experts said he lacked that authority. The temporary deferral would not directly aid unemployed workers, who do not pay the tax when they are jobless. Employees would need to repay the federal government eventually without an act of Congress.

    The president was silent on how he would fund Medicare and Social Security benefits that the 7% tax on employee income covers. Democrats seized on the possible threat to Social Security as a signal that Trump wanted to cut the social safety net. His team pushed back.

    “If the Democrats want to challenge us in court and hold up unemployment benefits to those hardworking Americans who are out of a job because of COVID, they’re going to have a lot of explaining to do,” Mnuchin said.

    Both the White House and congressional Democrats indicated Sunday they wanted to resume negotiations but no talks were scheduled.

    The breakdown comes with the Nov. 3 election approaching and the White House nervously watching signs that the economic recovery is slowing down as the coronavirus surges.

    “This is not presidential leadership,” Biden said. “These orders are not real solutions. They are just another cynical ploy designed to deflect responsibility. Some measures do far more harm than good.”

    Pelosi and Mnuchin were on “Fox News Sunday,” Schumer was on ABC’s “This Week” and Lamont was on CBS’ “Face the Nation.”

    LEAVE A REPLY

    Please enter your comment!
    Please enter your name here

    Latest Posts

    Sara Errani accuses Kiki Bertens of faking injury after she left court in wheelchair at French Open

    'I don't like when somebody is joking on you': Furious Sara Errani accuses Kiki Bertens of faking injury after she left court in a...

    Tottenham close in on loan move for Benfica’s Carlos Vinicius

    Tottenham set to FINALLY sign back-up for Harry Kane as they close in on loan move for Benfica striker Carlos Vinicius with an option...

    Coronavirus rates are NOT going up among school-age children, Professor Chris Whitty says

    Coronavirus infection rates are NOT going up among school-age children, Professor Chris Whitty says in 'important' reminder to people worried about the virus spreading...

    Young boy pushed out of stolen car during police chase on estate

    Terrifying moment young boy is pushed out of a stolen car during police chase through housing estate Police officers pursing the stolen Ford Kuga through...