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    Australian criminal psychologist reveals why some people are destined to kill

    ‘There are individuals who are born evil’: Top Australian criminal psychologist reveals why some people are destined to kill – and the terrifying signs you need to watch out for

    He has analysed the minds of Australia’s worst criminals, including mass murderer Julian Knight and Melbourne crime boss Alphonse Gangitano.

    Now, top Australian forensic psychologist Tim Watson-Munro has lifted the lid on the murky world of crime and why some people are destined for a life of lawlessness. 

    Speaking exclusively to Daily Mail Australia to promote the vast catalogue of true crime docuseries on hayu, Watson-Munro explained that while there are many factors that could lead someone to become a criminal, some people are simply born ‘evil’. 

    ‘In my view, there are some individuals who are born evil’: Top Australian forensic psychologist Tim Watson-Munro (pictured) has lifted the lid on the murky world of crime and why some people are destined for a life of lawlessness

    ‘In my view, there are some individuals who are born evil,’ he said.  

    ‘They are psychopathic from the start and demonstrate anti-social traits even during their pre-adolescent years. This can involve cruelty to animals, lighting fires and pathological lying,’ he continued. 

    These behaviour patterns become hardwired with time, and can also be exacerbated by the use of drugs and alcohol, Watson-Munro explained. 

    Monsters: Watson-Munro has analysed the minds of Australia's worst criminals, including mass murderer Julian Knight (pictured)

    Monsters: Watson-Munro has analysed the minds of Australia’s worst criminals, including mass murderer Julian Knight (pictured) 

    The impact of ‘social learning’ must also be considered, including the home environment in which a person is raised, their role models and families.    

    The idea of genetics playing a role in criminality is explored in hayu series The Killer Siblings, which tells the story of identical twin murderers the Stovall brothers.  

    Watson-Munro, who has worked with almost 20,000 criminals, also shared the body language cues which can suggest a suspect is guilty during interrogation. 

    'They are psychopathic from the start': Watson-Munro (pictured) explained that children who display psychopathic behaviour such as cruelty to animals, lighting fires and pathological lying may be early indicators they will one day become a criminal

    ‘They are psychopathic from the start’: Watson-Munro (pictured) explained that children who display psychopathic behaviour such as cruelty to animals, lighting fires and pathological lying may be early indicators they will one day become a criminal 

    Genetic riddle: The idea of genetics playing a role in criminality is explored in hayu series The Killer Siblings, which tells the story of identical twin murderers the Stovall brothers (pictured)

    Genetic riddle: The idea of genetics playing a role in criminality is explored in hayu series The Killer Siblings, which tells the story of identical twin murderers the Stovall brothers (pictured) 

    ‘Defensive body language such as closed arms, fidgeting when questioned on pertinent aspects of the case and an absence of eye contact, may reflect a consciousness of guilt,’ he said. 

    ‘More seasoned psychopaths however who are well adapted to the interview process tend to approach the situation with an air of bravado, with well-rehearsed responses to anticipated questions.’   

    The absence of emotion in someone’s voice has, in the past, been used as a way to identify guilt. 

    Not a failsafe method of detecting guilt: Some innocent people have received criticism for not showing enough emotion - such as Lindy Chamberlain (pictured left, with ex-husband Michael) who was wrongfully convicted for the murder of her child

    Not a failsafe method of detecting guilt: Some innocent people have received criticism for not showing enough emotion – such as Lindy Chamberlain (pictured left, with ex-husband Michael) who was wrongfully convicted for the murder of her child 

    On the other hand, however, Watson-Munro pointed out that some innocent people have received criticism for not showing enough emotion – such as Lindy Chamberlain who was wrongfully convicted for the murder of her child.   

    Therefore, while body language is a useful diagnostic tool in criminal investigation, it should not be considered as infallible. 

    Rather, it should be used as ‘an adjunct to more reliable and valid means of investigations such as DNA evidence and eye witness accounts,’ he explained. 

    Not the hayu you know… Stream more than 40 true crime docuseries including Snapped and In Ice Cold Blood on hayu.

    Painting a picture of guilt: Body language should be used as 'an adjunct to more reliable and valid means of investigations such as DNA evidence and eye witness accounts,' Watson-Munro (pictured) explained

    Painting a picture of guilt: Body language should be used as ‘an adjunct to more reliable and valid means of investigations such as DNA evidence and eye witness accounts,’ Watson-Munro (pictured) explained

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