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    • Iowa State will allow 25,000 fans at the football team’s opener against visiting Louisiana-Lafayette on September 12 despite a recent coronavirus surge
    • The surrounding city of Ames, Iowa now has the second-worst outbreak in the country relative to population size, according to The New York Times 
    • Dr. John Paschen, the chairman of the Story County Board of Health, said he was ‘sorely disappointed’ by the university’s decision to allow spectators
    • Athletic director Jamie Pollard responded: ‘I’m sure Dr. Paschen feel strongly… but [other people in this community] feel just as strongly that he’s not correct’
    • Trump has urged college football conferences to proceed with the fall season, while the Big Ten and Pac-12 voted to push their 2020 campaigns until spring 
    • The University of Iowa has 326 new cases of coronavirus for a total of 922
    • Some parents of University of Iowa football players – and Donald Trump – are pushing to play this fall after the Big Ten postponed the season until spring

    Iowa State University has decided to allow 25,000 fans at the football team’s opener against visiting Louisiana-Lafayette on September 12 despite the recent coronavirus surge in the surrounding city of Ames, which now reportedly has the second-worst outbreak in the country relative to population size. 

    ISU athletic director Jamie Pollard informed fans in a letter that 25,000 season ticket holders will be permitted to attend the 2020 home opener, but will be prohibited from tailgating and required to wear face coverings while respecting others’ wishes for social distancing. 

    Ames, Iowa’s Jack Trice Stadium has capacity for 61,500 spectators at football games. 

    Meanwhile, according to the Iowa City Press-Citizen, the University of Iowa has 326 newly confirmed cases of coronavirus, pushing that school’s total to 922. Unlike Iowa State, which plays in the Big 12, the University of Iowa’s football season has been postponed until spring by the Big Ten Conference. ISU sits about 140 miles west of the University of Iowa campus in Iowa City. 

    The parents of many University of Iowa players, along with President Donald Trump, have urged Big Ten commissioner Kevin Warren to reverse his decision, but he has yet to change course. 

    ‘Had a very productive conversation with Kevin Warren, Commissioner of the Big Ten Conference, about immediately starting up Big Ten football,’ Trump wrote on Twitter. ‘Would be good (great!) for everyone – Players, Fans, Country. On the one yard line!’ 

    Iowa State University has decided to allow 25,000 fans at the football team’s opener against visiting Louisiana-Lafayette on September 12 despite the recent coronavirus surge in the surrounding city of Ames, which now has the second-worst outbreak in the country relative to population size. Ames’ Jack Trice Stadium (pictured) has capacity for 61,500 spectators

    ISU athletic director Jamie Pollard (pictured) informed fans in a letter that 25,000 season ticket holders will be permitted to attend the 2020 home opener, but will be prohibited from tailgating and required to wear face coverings while respecting others' wishes for social distancing

    Dr. John Paschen (pictured), the chairman of the Story County Board of Health, said he was 'sorely disappointed' by the decision, according to KCCI-TV . In his response, Pollard weighed Paschen's concerns against the objections of community members. 'I'm sure Dr. Paschen feel strongly about where he is coming from, but there are other people in this community that feel just as strongly that he's not correct,' Pollard told KCCI-TV

    ISU athletic director Jamie Pollard (left) informed fans in a letter that 25,000 season ticket holders will be permitted to attend the 2020 home opener, but will be prohibited from tailgating and required to wear face coverings while respecting others’ wishes for social distancing. Dr. John Paschen (right), the chairman of the Story County Board of Health, said he was ‘sorely disappointed’ by the decision, according to KCCI-TV . In his response, Pollard weighed Paschen’s concerns against the objections of community members. ‘I’m sure Dr. Paschen feel strongly about where he is coming from, but there are other people in this community that feel just as strongly that he’s not correct,’ Pollard told KCCI-TV

    Texas Tech Red Raiders wide receiver Dylan Cantrell (14) goes up for a touchdown pass as Iowa State Cyclones defensive back Brian Peavy (10), Iowa State Cyclones defensive back D'Andre Payne (1) and Iowa State Cyclones defensive back Jarnor Jones (12) defend during the first half of an NCAA football game between the Texas Tech Red Raiders and the Iowa State Cyclones on November 19, 2016, at Jack Trice Stadium in Ames

    Texas Tech Red Raiders wide receiver Dylan Cantrell (14) goes up for a touchdown pass as Iowa State Cyclones defensive back Brian Peavy (10), Iowa State Cyclones defensive back D’Andre Payne (1) and Iowa State Cyclones defensive back Jarnor Jones (12) defend during the first half of an NCAA football game between the Texas Tech Red Raiders and the Iowa State Cyclones on November 19, 2016, at Jack Trice Stadium in Ames

    As for Iowa State’s decision, Dr. John Paschen, the chairman of the Story County Board of Health, said he was ‘sorely disappointed,’ according to a statement given to CBS affiliate, KCCI-TV.

    In his response, Pollard weighed Paschen’s concerns against the objections of community members.

    ‘I’m sure Dr. Paschen feel strongly about where he is coming from, but there are other people in this community that feel just as strongly that he’s not correct,’ Pollard told KCCI-TV.

    Ames currently has 8.7 confirmed cases of coronavirus per 1,000 citizens, putting the central Iowa city behind only Muskogee, Oklahoma, according to The New York Times. Furthermore, data released Monday from Iowa’s Department of Public Health revealed 611 new cases and two more deaths, bringing the state’s total to 1,112.

    Currently 12 Iowa counties have a positivity rate of 15 percent or higher, according to CBS.com.

    President Donald Trump has urged top-level college football conferences to proceed with the fall season, while the Big Ten and Pac-12 have voted to push their 2020 campaigns until spring. 

    Despite the fall sports postponements throughout all NCAA levels, Trump’s new pandemic adviser, Dr. Scott Atlas, continues to say that football should be played this fall.

    ‘The communities of college towns depend on these activities,’ Atlas said during an appearance with Florida Governor Ron DeSantis in Tallahassee on Monday.

    In spite of the reported health risks, Trump has continued to push for a fall football season

    In spite of the reported health risks, Trump has continued to push for a fall football season

    The Big Ten announced August 11 it would move its football season from fall to spring semester because of health risks associated with the coronavirus pandemic. The Pac-12 followed suit, joining the Mid-American Conference and the Mountain West.

    ‘No, I want Big Ten, and all other football, back – NOW,’ Trump tweeted on August 28. ‘The Dems don’t want football back, for political reasons, but are trying to blame me and the Republicans. Another LIE, but this is what we are up against! They should also open up all of their Shutdown States.’

    Monday a court filing revealed that Big Ten Conference presidents voted 11-3 to postpone the football season, bringing some clarity to a key question raised in a lawsuit brought by a group of Nebraska football players.

    The vote breakdown was revealed in the Big Ten’s response to the lawsuit.

    The court documents did not identify how each school voted, but a person familiar with the outcome told The Associated Press that Iowa, Nebraska and Ohio State voted against postponing the fall football season. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the Big Ten was not planning on making the specifics of its vote public.

    The eight Nebraska football players are seeking the reinstatement of a fall season.

    ‘The Big Ten Conference continues to share the disappointment that student-athletes and families are feeling,’ the conference said in a statement. ‘The Big Ten Return to Competition Task Force will continue to be transparent as it actively considers options to get back to competition when it is safe to play.’

    The lawsuit in Lancaster County District Court contends, among other things, the players are losing a chance for development, exposure for a possible pro career and won’t be able to market themselves to eventually capitalize on name, image and likeness revenue opportunities.

    President Donald Trump has urged top-level college football conferences to proceed with the fall season, while the Big Ten and Pac-12 have voted to push their 2020 campaigns until spring. Iowa State plays in the Big 12, which did not postpone its season. Despite the fall sports postponements throughout all NCAA levels, Trump's new pandemic adviser, Dr. Scott Atlas, continues to say that football should be played this fall. 'The communities of college towns depend on these activities,' Atlas (pictured) said during an appearance with Florida Governor Ron DeSantis in Tallahassee on Monday

    President Donald Trump has urged top-level college football conferences to proceed with the fall season, while the Big Ten and Pac-12 have voted to push their 2020 campaigns until spring. Iowa State plays in the Big 12, which did not postpone its season. Despite the fall sports postponements throughout all NCAA levels, Trump’s new pandemic adviser, Dr. Scott Atlas, continues to say that football should be played this fall. ‘The communities of college towns depend on these activities,’ Atlas (pictured) said during an appearance with Florida Governor Ron DeSantis in Tallahassee on Monday

    In this November 2, 2019, file photo, Nebraska quarterback Adrian Martinez (2) runs against Purdue during the second half of an NCAA college football game in West Lafayette

    In this November 2, 2019, file photo, Nebraska quarterback Adrian Martinez (2) runs against Purdue during the second half of an NCAA college football game in West Lafayette

    The Big Ten filing was a response in opposition to the players’ motion for expedited discovery.

    The filing said the 11-3 vote ‘far exceeded’ the 60% threshold the Big Ten requires. The filing also said the Big Ten based its decision on multiple factors, including the medical advice and counsel of the Big Ten Task Force for Emerging Infectious Diseases and the Big Ten Sports Medicine Committee.

    Listed as plaintiffs are Brant and Brig Banks, Alante Brown, Noa Pola-Gates, Jackson Hannah, Garrett Nelson, Ethan Piper and Garrett Snodgrass.

    The players’ attorney, Mike Flood, declined immediate comment, saying he needed to read the filing.

    Flood, a former speaker of the Nebraska Legislature, owns five radio stations that broadcast Cornhuskers football games as part of the Husker Sports Network.

    The lawsuit says the Big Ten’s decision-making process was ‘flawed and ambiguous’ and called into question whether the league’s Council of Presidents and Chancellors formally voted on the decision. The medical studies used to make the decision, the lawsuit says, were not relevant to the circumstances of college-age athletes and did not take into account school safety measures.

    ‘This decision did not occur in a vacuum,’ the conference said in its filing.

    Jay Kallenberger, parent of two University of Iowa football players, speaks at a press conference asking for more transparency and communication by the Big Ten outside of their headquarters on August 21, 2020. Parents of Big Ten football players, upset over the process that led to the postponement of the season until spring, held a protest near the conference's Chicago-area headquarters Friday while an attorney in Nebraska demanded commissioner Kevin Warren turn over material illustrating how the decision was made

    Jay Kallenberger, parent of two University of Iowa football players, speaks at a press conference asking for more transparency and communication by the Big Ten outside of their headquarters on August 21, 2020. Parents of Big Ten football players, upset over the process that led to the postponement of the season until spring, held a protest near the conference’s Chicago-area headquarters Friday while an attorney in Nebraska demanded commissioner Kevin Warren turn over material illustrating how the decision was made

    Big Ten commissioner Kevin Warren (pictured) has faced sharp criticism for not clearly laying out how the decision was reached. He has sidestepped questions about the vote breakdown, and his explanations of the medical reasons were panned for not being detailed enough

    Big Ten commissioner Kevin Warren (pictured) has faced sharp criticism for not clearly laying out how the decision was reached. He has sidestepped questions about the vote breakdown, and his explanations of the medical reasons were panned for not being detailed enough 

    The decision not to play fall football has created a firestorm in Big Ten country, fanned by the fact the ACC and SEC are pushing ahead with plans to start their seasons in September.

    Commissioner Kevin Warren has faced sharp criticism for not clearly laying out how the decision was reached. He has sidestepped questions about the vote breakdown, and his explanations of the medical reasons were panned for not being detailed enough.

    A group of Nebraska player parents have been most vocal in demanding answers from the commissioner, and parents from other Big Ten schools joined them.

    The Big Ten said last week the lawsuit ‘has no merit and we will defend the decision to protect all student-athletes as we navigate through this global pandemic. We are actively considering options to get back to competition and look forward to doing so when it is safe to play.’

    Flood, in his role representing the Nebraska player parents, previously sent a letter to Warren asking for documents relating to any votes taken, how each school voted, meeting minutes and all audio and video recordings and transcripts of meetings where votes were cast. He also wanted copies of studies, scientific data and medical information or advice considered by the presidents.

    Flood had threatened a federal lawsuit if the materials weren’t delivered to him. The Big Ten did not respond to the letter.

    University of Iowa football players father Rodney Dixon, left, fist bumps Ohio State football players father Randy Wade outside Big Ten headquarters in Rosemont, Illinois. Parents of Big Ten football players, upset over the process that led to the postponement of the season until spring, held a protest near the conference's Chicago-area headquarters in August while an attorney in Nebraska demanded commissioner Kevin Warren turn over material illustrating how the decision was made

    University of Iowa football players father Rodney Dixon, left, fist bumps Ohio State football players father Randy Wade outside Big Ten headquarters in Rosemont, Illinois. Parents of Big Ten football players, upset over the process that led to the postponement of the season until spring, held a protest near the conference’s Chicago-area headquarters in August while an attorney in Nebraska demanded commissioner Kevin Warren turn over material illustrating how the decision was made

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