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    The Singapore Grip viewers celebrate as Matthew ‘finally’ discovers what the title phrase means

    The Singapore Grip viewers celebrate as leading character Matthew ‘finally’ discovers what the VERY racy title phrase really means during steamy scene with new lover

    • The Singapore Grip has finally shown what phrase means with a very racy scene 
    • Matthew Webb and his love interest Vera Chiang are reunited in the episode
    • Set during Second World War, drama follows a rich British family in Singapore 

    It’s kept viewers in suspense over the meaning of its title, and now The Singapore Grip has finally shown what the phrase signifies with a very racy scene.

    Episode four of the ITV’s WWII drama, which aired last night, saw Matthew Webb (portrayed by Luke Treadaway), the son of a powerful aristocrat (played by Game of Throne’s Charles Dance), reunite with his love interest Vera Chiang (Elizabeth Tan).

    Little is known of the beautiful and mysterious young woman who was friends with the leading character’s father Mr Webb, but the lovers continued to dance around one another until Vera invited Matthew to her home.

    The stunner performed the Singapore Grip on Matthew, which is a technique used by women to tighten their vagina during sex, with viewers celebrating ‘finally’ discovering the meaning behind the phrase. 

    Based on the 1978 novel by JG Farrell, which drew on real events, The Singapore Grip is the story of rich Brits living in the Crown colony in the early 1940s until the invasion of the Japan in 1942, one of the key events of the Second World War, throws their lives into turmoil.

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    It’s kept viewers in suspense over the meaning of its title, and now The Singapore Grip has finally shown what the phrase signifies with a very racy scene (pictured)

    Episode four of the ITV's WWII drama, which aired last night, saw Matthew Webb (pictured) (portrayed by Luke Treadaway), the son of a powerful aristocrat (played by Game of Throne’s Charles Dance), reunite with his love interest Vera Chiang (Elizabeth Tan)

    Episode four of the ITV’s WWII drama, which aired last night, saw Matthew Webb (pictured) (portrayed by Luke Treadaway), the son of a powerful aristocrat (played by Game of Throne’s Charles Dance), reunite with his love interest Vera Chiang (Elizabeth Tan)

    In yesterday’s show, Matthew was seen reuniting with his father’s friend Vera Chiang after she cared for him in the last episode during his fever. 

    What does the Singapore Grip mean? 

    The Singapore Grip involves the woman using her vaginal muscles to stimulate the man’s penis during intercourse, while stationary.

    The technique is thought to have originated in India and has its background in the traditions of Hindu and Buddhist culture.

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    After Matthew insisted he will help his lover leave Singapore to escape the Japanese invasion, Vera invited Matthew to her home, and when there, the romantic chemistry quickly escalated.

    Vera takes the lead after admitting that she’s ‘not so happy with how you like to do this in the West, like a collision between two drunk drivers’. 

    ‘We like to think love is an art,’ she explained before showing a shocked Matthew a book of sexual positions.

    During intercourse, Vera performed the Singapore Grip on Matthew, which is a sexual technique which involves the woman using her vaginal muscles to stimulate a man’s penis during intercourse while they remain stationary. 

    ‘What was that?’ a stunned Matthew questioned, while a smug Vera replied: ‘That was the Singapore Grip.’

    In the series, the term ‘Singapore grip’ is a running joke, as naive Matthew doesn’t know it describes a sexual act and uses it in a variety of other ways, including to describe a type of greeting or a bag. 

    Following the scene, one viewer wrote: ‘Oh, so he’s found out what it is now!’, while another said: ‘He’s finally going to find out what it is.’ 

    Vera performed the Singapore Grip on Matthew, which is a technique used by women to tighten their vagina during sex, with viewers (above) celebrating 'finally' discovering the meaning behind the phrase

    Vera performed the Singapore Grip on Matthew, which is a technique used by women to tighten their vagina during sex, with viewers (above) celebrating ‘finally’ discovering the meaning behind the phrase

    In yesterday's show, Matthew (pictured) was seen reuniting with his father's friend Vera Chiang after she cared for him in the last episode during his fever

    In yesterday’s show, Matthew (pictured) was seen reuniting with his father’s friend Vera Chiang after she cared for him in the last episode during his fever

    Matthew is seen returning to Singapore in the first episode, after the passing of his father Mr Webb (pictured with Elizabeth Tan as Vera Chiang)

    Matthew is seen returning to Singapore in the first episode, after the passing of his father Mr Webb (pictured with Elizabeth Tan as Vera Chiang)

    A third added: ‘No wonder he’s been desperate to find her again since episode one’ and a fourth wrote: ‘Lucky, lucky him.’ 

    The programme has been widely panned by viewers, with some saying the ‘awful’ script had left the actors with ‘nothing to work with’. 

    ‘Is this supposed to be a comedy because the acting and script are very OTT?!’ one person wrote. ‘Not sure what to make of it. #singaporegrip’  

    Another added: ‘I was looking forward to the Singapore Grip, but am finding it quite boring…very disappointing.’

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