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    Qantas launches ‘flight to somewhere’ including a champagne breakfast, amazing views and dinner

    Qantas launches once-in-a-lifetime ‘flight to somewhere’ including a champagne breakfast, amazing views and dinner under the stars – so would you pay $2,500 for a 24 hour trip?

    • The ‘flight to somewhere’ from Sydney to Uluru includes a hotel, food and tours 
    • Qantas will do low level flybys of Sydney Harbour and Uluru for a birds eye view
    • Travellers will enjoy walks, a star-lit dinner and Indigenous activities in Uluru
    • They will watch Uluru at sunrise before flying back to Sydney the very next day
    • Economy tickets are $2,499 per person while Business Class tickets are $3,999 
    • It is expected to sell out like the similarly-named ‘flight to nowhere’ last month

    Qantas has launched a $2,500 scenic ‘flight to somewhere’ in a bid to boost travel amid the COVID-19 economic downturn. 

    The return trip from Sydney to Uluru includes flights, accommodation, food and activities in the Red Centre – departing on December 5 and returning the next day. 

    Qantas previously sold a seven-hour scenic ‘flight to nowhere’ from Sydney to Queensland and back in September.

    The flight sold out in just ten minutes despite passengers not being allowed to leave the plane because of border restrictions.

    The national carrier’s new ‘flight to somewhere’ will go on sale at 2pm on Thursday and is expected to sell out quickly. 

    Qantas’ ‘flight to somewhere’ from Sydney to Uluru includes flights, accommodation, food and activities in the Red Centre – departing on December 5 and returning the next day. The plane will do low level flybys of Sydney Harbour (pictured) on departure and return 

    The ‘flight to somewhere’, as this time it does actually land in the Northern Territory, begins with a champagne breakfast in the Qantas lounge at Sydney Airport. 

    Next, the 110 passengers will board a Qantas 737, which will do low level flybys of Sydney Harbour on departure. 

    Once at the Red Centre in the Northern Territory, low level flying will offer passengers a bird’s eye view of Uluru and Kata Tjuta before the plane lands. 

    During their stay, guests will enjoy an indigenous art workshop, a three-course dinner under the stars using native ingredients, a didgeridoo performance and an Indigenous interpretation of the night sky.

    Included in the trip is overnight twin share accommodation at Sails in the Desert hotel.

    The following morning, passengers will watch the sun rise over Uluru and a guided walk to the Muṯitjulu Waterhole.

    They will then visit neighbouring Kata Tjuta before a late morning brunch and a flight back to Sydney for a final harbour flyby before landing.

    Economy Class tickets for $2,499 per person and Business Class tickets for $3,999 per person go on sale on the Qantas website at 2pm on Thursday. 

    Once at the Red Centre, low level circuits will offer passengers a bird's eye view of Uluru (pictured) and Kata Tjuta before the plane lands

    Once at the Red Centre, low level circuits will offer passengers a bird’s eye view of Uluru (pictured) and Kata Tjuta before the plane lands

    The Northern Territory lifted its restrictions to Sydney on October 9, meaning all Australians outside Victoria can now visit.

    Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce said feedback from the previous ‘flight to nowhere’ has been ‘fantastic’. 

    ‘Even the most frequent flyers said they had never experienced Australia from the air quite like that. And our crew loved being back on board,’ he said. 

    ‘Now that more borders are starting to open, we’re partnering with tourism operators on the ground to offer special flights to special destinations.’ 

    Mr Joyce said the national carrier is ‘ready to ramp up our regular services’ in the lead up to Christmas ‘to help reunite families and friends by the end of the year’. 

    ‘Across Qantas and Jetstar, we’re currently operating at just under 30 per cent of our pre-COVID domestic capacity,’ he said. 

    ‘If borders continue to be relaxed, we’re hoping that will reach about 50 per cent by Christmas. That will be great news for a lot of people in the travel and tourism industry as well.’ 

    During their stay, guests will enjoy an Indigenous art workshop, a Night at Field of Light including a three-course dinner under the stars (pictured) using native ingredients, with a didgeridoo performance and an Indigenous interpretation of the night sky

    During their stay, guests will enjoy an Indigenous art workshop, a Night at Field of Light including a three-course dinner under the stars (pictured) using native ingredients, with a didgeridoo performance and an Indigenous interpretation of the night sky

    International tourists have been banned since March 20 to quell the spread of coronavirus, badly impacting the travel industry and also stopping Australians from holidaying overseas.

    It has prompted Qantas to think of the attention-grabbing solutions. 

    Unlike the new ‘flight to somewhere’, the similarly-named ‘flight to nowhere’ did not actually land at another location. 

    It took off from Sydney, flew over Sydney Harbour, northern NSW, the Gold Coast and Great Barrier Reef before flying back to the NSW capital. 

    Economy tickets were priced at $787, premium economy at $1,787 and business class was $3,787 but still the flight sold out in under ten minutes on in September. 

    The flight, which departed on October 10, is one of the fastest-selling in Qantas history. 

    A branded pillow and champagne on board the 'flight so nowhere'. Unlike the 'flight to somewhere', the 'flight to somewhere' was a flight that departed from Sydney and landed back in the NSW capital after doing a loop of Queensland

    A branded pillow and champagne on board the ‘flight so nowhere’. Unlike the ‘flight to somewhere’, the ‘flight to somewhere’ was a flight that departed from Sydney and landed back in the NSW capital after doing a loop of Queensland 

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