How Australian sunseekers may soon have to PAY by the hour to go the beach 

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How Australian sunseekers will soon be asked to PAY by the hour to go the beach

  • Sunseekers are asked to donate $1 for every hour they spend at the beach 
  • The radical plan is to help Surf Life Saving volunteers on patrol this summer
  • Randwick Council has introduced the six safety measures for beachgoers 
  • Sunseerkers asked to wear masks to the beach and leave after swimming
  • Rules come as NSW records 17 days without locally acquired Covid cases
  • Government is expected to ease some of the strictest coronavirus restrictions

Sunseekers are being asked to donate $1 for every hour they spend at the beach this summer as part of a radical plan to help surf lifesavers.

The money from the Adopt an Hour ad campaign will go towards the 180,000 volunteers who will spend 1.4 million hours on patrol this summer.

‘We’re asking the public to consider donating $1 for every hour… so that when you need them the most, they’re there to help,’ Surf Life Saving Foundation chief executive John Brennan said. 

The bold initiative comes as new safety rules are introduced at some of Sydney’s most popular to ensure social distancing measures are followed.

Sunseekers are being asked to donate $1 for every hour they spend at the beach this summer as part of a radical plan to help Surf Life Savers (Pictured: Bondi Beach last week)

The money from the Adopt an Hour ad campaign will go towards the 180,000 volunteers will spend 1.4 million hours on patrol this summer

The money from the Adopt an Hour ad campaign will go towards the 180,000 volunteers will spend 1.4 million hours on patrol this summer

Randwick Council created the six safety measures for Clovelly, Coogee, Maroubra, Malabar, Little Bay, and La Perouse to reduce the risk of a Covid-19 outbreak.

Beachgoers are asked to keep at least a towel’s length apart from other groups and leave the beach once they’ve had a swim instead of spending all day sunbathing.

The council is also asking residents to check beach capacity via the council’s live beach cams and avoid peak times.

Residents are encouraged to wear a mask while getting to the beach when they can’t social distance, such as on public transport.

Randwick Mayor Danny Said hopes the rules will ensure the beaches remain open throughout the scorching summer months. 

Many Sydney beaches were forced to close in March after massive crowds continued to flock to the ocean despite social distancing rules. 

Beachgoers are being asked to keep at least a towel's length apart from others and leave the beach once they've had a swim (Pictured: A woman at Bondi Beach)

Beachgoers are being asked to keep at least a towel’s length apart from others and leave the beach once they’ve had a swim (Pictured: A woman at Bondi Beach)

The council is also asking residents to check beach capacity via the council's live beach cams and avoid peak times

The council is also asking residents to check beach capacity via the council’s live beach cams and avoid peak times

‘There’s nothing more Sydney than a summer’s day out at the beach, but we all know that this summer is going to be different,’ Mr Said said.

‘Our beaches are important destinations and our goal this summer is to keep them open. We’re asking for the public’s help – and working closely with local police – in ensuring crowd numbers don’t exceed safe capacities.’

The rules come as the government prepares ease some of the strictest coronavirus restrictions on gatherings in the lead-up to Christmas.

The changes are expected to be signed off at the NSW Government’s weekly Covid-19 meeting on Wednesday morning. 

Randwick Council has introduced the six safety measures for Clovelly, Coogee, Maroubra, Malabar, Little Bay and La Perouse to reduce the risk of a Covid-19 outbreak

Randwick Council has introduced the six safety measures for Clovelly, Coogee, Maroubra, Malabar, Little Bay and La Perouse to reduce the risk of a Covid-19 outbreak

Many Sydney beaches were forced to close in March after massive crowds continued to flock to the ocean despite social distancing rules (Pictured: A woman sunbathing in Sydney)

Many Sydney beaches were forced to close in March after massive crowds continued to flock to the ocean despite social distancing rules (Pictured: A woman sunbathing in Sydney)

Residents are also being encouraged to wear a mask while getting to the beach

Residents are also being encouraged to wear a mask while getting to the beach

From December 1, hospitality venues of up to 200sqm can double their capacity.

Venues will be allowed to have one person per 2sqm indoors, up to a maximum of 50 customers.

Household gatherings will also be boosted to 30 people and up to 50 people will be allowed to gather outside. 

Rules are also expected to change to encourage more workers to go back to the office.

The easing of restrictions comes after NSW recorded 17 days without any locally-acquired Covid-19 cases.

RULES FOR BEACHGOERS THIS SUMMER: 

1. Check the COVID crowd capacity rating and live beach cams on www.randwick.nsw.gov.au before leaving home.

2. Wear a mask while getting to the beach if social distancing isn’t possible

3. Keep a towel’s length (1.5m) apart from other beach goers

4. Leave the beach once you’ve had a swim

5. Visit outside of peak times such as during the week, early mornings and evenings, and

6. Come back at a different time if the beach is busy.

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