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Home News Blood found on Louise Smith’s uncle’s trainers one billion times more likely to have come from her

Blood found on Louise Smith’s uncle’s trainers one billion times more likely to have come from her

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Blood found on Louise Smith’s uncle’s trainers one billion times more likely to have come from her

Blood found on Louise Smith’s uncle’s Adidas trainers was one billion times more likely to have come from the 16-year-old anyone else, murder trial hears

  • Blood on trainers of Louise Smith’s uncle  more likely to have come from her 
  • Shane Mays, 30, is accused of the murder of the aspiring veterinary nurse 
  • Two confirmed blood stains on outside of shoe and smaller one inside opening
  • Louise went missing in Havant, Hampshire, at 12.49pm on May 8, a court heard 

The blood stains found on the trainers of Louise Smith’s uncle were ‘one billion times’ more likely to have come from the teenager than from someone else, a court heard today.

Louise vanished in Havant, Hampshire, at 12.49pm on May 8, having been ‘lured’ one and a half miles away to the murder scene at Havant Thicket by Shane Mays, a court heard.

Mays, 30, is accused of the ‘brutal’ murder of the teenager whose body was found in thick woodland two weeks after she went missing on VE day. 

Today, Edward Dowlman, a forensic scientist, explained that the blood stains found on Mays’ Adidas trainers were ‘one billion times’ more likely to have come from Louise than someone else.

He also said that there were two confirmed blood stains on the outside of the left shoe and another smaller one inside the opening. 

Louise Smith’s uncle Shane Mays, 30, (right with his wife, Chazlynn Jayne Mays ) is accused of the ‘brutal’ murder of the teenager

Today forensic scientist Edward Dowlman explained that the blood stains found on Mays' Adidas trainers were 'one billion times' more likely to have come from Louise than someone else

Today forensic scientist Edward Dowlman explained that the blood stains found on Mays’ Adidas trainers were ‘one billion times’ more likely to have come from Louise than someone else

The scientist said there were two confirmed blood stains on the outside of the left shoe and another smaller one inside the opening

The scientist said there were two confirmed blood stains on the outside of the left shoe and another smaller one inside the opening

One of the white Adidas shoes worn by Mays with green stripes had three spots of blood on the outside and another smaller one inside the opening.

The court saw the shoe itself and were also shown pictures of the right shoe which had even smaller specks of blood on it.

There was a ‘minor profile’ of Mays’ DNA inside the shoes which was consistent with it being his, the court heard.

Mr Dowlman said: ‘We found two dark brown stains which we confirmed is blood staining.

‘There was another in the opening of the shoe, again confirmed as blood staining.

‘It has been calculated it is at least one billion times more likely [the blood] originated from Louise Smith rather than another unrelated individual.

‘[We can see] Spots of blood. Small circular stains from blood usually mean that they were airborne before landing on an item.’

He added that no blood had been found on the shoes of Mays wife, Chazlynn Jayne (CJ) Mays. 

Aspiring veterinary nurse Louise – who only started living with Mays and his wife CJ a few weeks before – was found with her skull smashed on May 21.

Her body had been ‘terribly’ defiled, and burned in what has been described as a ‘cruel and brutal’ murder. 

Today Mays’ barrister outlined to a jury a possible version of events leading up to the tragic death of the aspiring veterinary student. 

They heard the ‘extremely vulnerable’ teenager went to the woods with the 30-year-old where they argued before he punched her and beat her while she lay defenceless on the ground.         

Louise vanished in Havant, Hampshire, at 12.49pm on May 8, sparking a huge two-week search for her

Louise vanished in Havant, Hampshire, at 12.49pm on May 8, sparking a huge two-week search for her

Cross examining Mr Dowlman, defence counsel Andrew Langdon QC asked him if the following version of events could explain Louise’s blood being found on Mays’ shoes.   

Mr Langdon said: ‘Mays walked with Louise to the woods. There was an argument, she picked up a stick, she hit him, he took the stick from her and punched her. Punched her many times.

‘At first she was standing then he punched her many times while she on the ground. Then he walked away.’

Mr Langdon asked the scientist whether that was the scenario he had been asked to consider and he confirmed it was.

He said in his opinion that version of events could account for the blood stains found on Mays’ shoes and also DNA found on a stick which had been ‘pushed’ inside the teenager’s body.

However, he said there could be other explanations.        

Mr Dowlman concluded that a mixture of DNA on the stick involved in the attack was ‘highly likely to be from’ Louise Smith and Shane Mays and there was a ‘far less likely’ chance some also came from CJ Mays.

The court also heard that after Mays was re-arrested for murder following the discovery of the teenager’s body he denied any involvement in her death before refusing to answer any more questions.

Detective Constable Julie Way, read out a police transcript from an interview with Shane Mays after he was arrested at a Holiday Inn on May 27.

Police officers at the area of woodland in Havant, Hampshire, during their investigation in May

Police officers at the area of woodland in Havant, Hampshire, during their investigation in May

In a pre-prepared statement, given to detectives, Mays said: ‘I have been arrested on suspicion of murder and I strongly deny this allegation. I have had no involvement at all in the murder of Louise Smith. That is all I wish to say at present.’

Previously the court heard from Home Office pathologist Dr Basil Purdue who said that there were signs of ‘catastrophic injuries, severe blood loss and potentially a copious inhalation of blood’ possibly caused by a ‘log’ or large branch on Louise’s body.

The jurors in the case were also told they will be visiting the site where the teenagers’ body was found on Monday morning to see how ‘remote’ the location was.

Mays denies murder but admits manslaughter. He also claims he did not defile or set fire to Louise.

The trial continues.    

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