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Strange string of lights seen over Seattle prompts UFO speculation

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Strange string of lights seen over Seattle prompts UFO speculation

The truth is out there! Seattle residents claim they have seen UFOs after spotting a string of lights in the sky – but astronomer claims its Elon Musk’s Starlink satellites orbiting the Earth

  • Dozens of Seattle residents spotted the strange lights above the city around 9.30pm local time on Tuesday 
  • The lights were even seen as far north as Vancouver, Canada
  • Several people in both countries claimed the lights must have come from a UFO
  • However, an astronomer shut down speculation by stating the lights came from SpaceX Starlight satellites that are currently orbiting the Earth

Strange lights seen over the skies of Seattle Tuesday night have left some residents wondering whether they have seen a UFO. 

Dozens of people took to Twitter to share footage of the unexplained lights, with many claiming it was evidence of extraterrestrial activity. 

Several videos show the long thin line of lights moving quickly across the darkened sky.  Social media users as far north as Vancouver, Canada – 120 miles from Seattle – also recorded clips of the flying objects. 

‘What did we just witness over the Seattle area?’ one asked. 

‘This thing was silent, huge in scale (at least a few football fields?) and moving fast to the southeast.’

The person pondered whether it could be a UFO, ‘a secret black budget government craft’ or some sort of technology from SpaceX – the aerospace company founded by Elon Musk.   

Indeed, many claimed the lights came from Starlink satellites, which are orbiting the Earth at present. 

Strange lights seen over the skies of Seattle Tuesday night have left some residents wondering whether they witnessed a UFO sighting

One Canadian resident questioned whether they had seen a UFO flying above Vancouver

One Canadian resident questioned whether they had seen a UFO flying above Vancouver 

Starlink is a satellite internet constellation constructed by SpaceX, which orbits the Earth and provides broadband access. The constellation consists of mass-produced small satellites which orbit about the Earth and work in combination with a ground transceiver. 

Jonathan McDowell, who work as an astronomer at the Center for Astrophysics, in Massachusetts took to social media saying that the lights certainly came from Starlink satellites. 

’60 Starlink satellites were launched from Kennedy Space Center on Tuesday afternoon. On their 7th orbit of the Earth they passed southeast over Seattle and central Idaho, at around 9.20-9.30pm Pacific Daylight Time, along the track shown here,’ he wrote above a map. 

‘So if you live in that area and saw a ‘string-of-pearls’ in the sky around that time, that was the Starlink sats, still close together after being deployed from the Falcon 9 rocket.’

This long-exposure image shows a trail of a group of SpaceX's Starlink satellites passing over Uruguay in February

This long-exposure image shows a trail of a group of SpaceX’s Starlink satellites passing over Uruguay in February

Jonathan McDowell, who work as an astronomer at he Center for Astrophysics, in Massachusetts took to social media saying that the lights came from Starlink satellites

Jonathan McDowell, who work as an astronomer at he Center for Astrophysics, in Massachusetts took to social media saying that the lights came from Starlink satellites

SpaceX Falcon 9 lifts off at the Kennedy Space Center on Tuesday. Designated as Starlink V1.0-L25, the rocket carries a payload with 60 satellites to be deployed for SpaceX's ongoing expansion of their Starlink broadband network

SpaceX Falcon 9 lifts off at the Kennedy Space Center on Tuesday. Designated as Starlink V1.0-L25, the rocket carries a payload with 60 satellites to be deployed for SpaceX’s ongoing expansion of their Starlink broadband network

Last year, astronomers complained that the Starlink satellites were too bright in the sky and ruin their uninterrupted views of the night sky. 

Musk promised to ‘fix’ the brightness of the satellites in an April 2020 Twitter post, responding to a user who asked: ‘

‘Is there a reason they’ve been brighter and more noticeable lately? I feel like tons of people are spotting them all of a sudden and they went fairly unnoticed before’. 

According to a report published in Vox last week, astronomers are still asserting that the satellites are too bright. 

‘The effect of the satellite constellations is like painting graffiti on a World Heritage Site. But not just graffiti in one particular location — graffiti that can be seen the world over,’ the report stated. 

SpaceX founder Elon Musk is pictured

SpaceX founder Elon Musk is pictured 

ELON MUSK’S SPACEX SET TO BRING BROADBAND INTERNET TO THE WORLD WITH ITS STARLINK CONSTELLATION OF SATELLITES

Elon Musk’s SpaceX has launched the fifth batch of its ‘Starlink’ space internet satellites – taking the total to 300.

They form a constellation of thousands of satellites, designed to provide low-cost broadband internet service from low Earth orbit.

The constellation, informally known as Starlink, and under development at SpaceX’s facilities in Redmond, Washington.

Its goal is to beam superfast internet into your home from space.

While satellite internet has been around for a while, it has suffered from high latency and unreliable connections.

Starlink is different. SpaceX says putting a ‘constellation’ of satellites in low earth orbit would provide high-speed, cable-like internet all over the world.

The billionaire’s company wants to create the global system to help it generate more cash.

Musk has previously said the venture could give three billion people who currently do not have access to the internet a cheap way of getting online.

It could also help fund a future city on Mars.

Helping humanity reach the red planet is one of Musk’s long-stated aims and was what inspired him to start SpaceX.

The company recently filed plans with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to launch 4,425 satellites into orbit above the Earth – three times as many that are currently in operation.

‘Once fully deployed, the SpaceX system will pass over virtually all parts of the Earth’s surface and therefore, in principle, have the ability to provide ubiquitous global service,’ the firm said.

‘Every point on the Earth’s surface will see, at all times, a SpaceX satellite.’

The network will provide internet access to the US and the rest of the world, it added.

It is expected to take more than five years and $9.8 billion (£7.1bn) of investment, although satellite internet has proved an expensive market in the past and analysts expect the final bill will be higher.

Musk compared the project to ‘rebuilding the internet in space’, as it would reduce reliance on the existing network of undersea fibre-optic cables which criss-cross the planet.

In the US, the FCC welcomed the scheme as a way to provide internet connections to more people.

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